Shelter vs Target - What's the difference?

shelter | target |


In lang=en terms the difference between shelter and target

is that shelter is to take cover while target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

As nouns the difference between shelter and target

is that shelter is a refuge, haven or other cover or protection from something while target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As verbs the difference between shelter and target

is that shelter is to provide cover from damage or harassment; to shield; to protect while target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

shelter

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A refuge, haven or other cover or protection from something.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1928, author=Lawrence R. Bourne
  • , title=Well Tackled! , chapter=7 citation , passage=The detective kept them in view. He made his way casually along the inside of the shelter until he reached an open scuttle close to where the two men were standing talking. Eavesdropping was not a thing Larard would have practised from choice, but there were times when, in the public interest, he had to do it, and this was one of them.}}
  • An institution that provides temporary housing for homeless people, battered women etc.
  • Derived terms

    * bus shelter

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To provide cover from damage or harassment; to shield; to protect.
  • * Dryden
  • Those ruins sheltered once his sacred head.
  • * Southey
  • You have no convents in which such persons may be received and sheltered .
  • To take cover.
  • During the rainstorm, we sheltered under a tree.

    target

    English

    (wikipedia target)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.
  • A goal or objective.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.
  • * 1598 , William Shakespeare, Henry IV , Part I, Act II, Scene IV, line 200,
  • These four came all afront, and mainly thrust at me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven points in my target , thus.
  • (obsolete) A shield resembling the Roman scutum. In modern usage, a smaller variety of shield is usually implied by this term.
  • * 1786 , Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 22,
  • The target or buckler was carried by the heavy armed foot, it answered to the scutum of the Romans; its form was sometimes that of a rectangular parallelogram, but more commonly had its bottom rounded off; it was generally convex, being curved in its breadth.
  • (sports) The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark.
  • (surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.
  • (rail transport) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.
  • (cricket) the number of runs that the side batting last needs to score in the final innings in order to win
  • (linguistics) The tenor of a metaphor.
  • (translation studies) The translated version of a document, or the language into which translation occurs.
  • A person (or group of people) that a person or organization is trying to employ or to have as a customer, audience etc.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Gary Cahill, a target for Arsenal and Tottenham before the transfer window closed, put England ahead early on and Rooney was on target twice before the interval as the early hostility of the Bulgarian supporters was swiftly subdued.}}

    Derived terms

    * targeter * targeting

    Synonyms

    * See also * (translated version) target language

    Coordinate terms

    * (translated version) source

    Verb

  • To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).
  • (figuratively) To aim for as an audience or demographic.
  • The advertising campaign targeted older women.
  • (computing) To produce code suitable for.
  • This cross-platform compiler can target any of several processors.

    See also

    *