Target vs Object - What's the difference?

target | object | Synonyms |

Target is a synonym of object.


As nouns the difference between target and object

is that target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile while object is a thing that has physical existence.

As verbs the difference between target and object

is that target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target) while object is to disagree with something or someone; especially in a court of law, to raise an objection.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

target

English

(wikipedia target)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.
  • A goal or objective.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.
  • * 1598 , William Shakespeare, Henry IV , Part I, Act II, Scene IV, line 200,
  • These four came all afront, and mainly thrust at me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven points in my target , thus.
  • (obsolete) A shield resembling the Roman scutum. In modern usage, a smaller variety of shield is usually implied by this term.
  • * 1786 , Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 22,
  • The target or buckler was carried by the heavy armed foot, it answered to the scutum of the Romans; its form was sometimes that of a rectangular parallelogram, but more commonly had its bottom rounded off; it was generally convex, being curved in its breadth.
  • (sports) The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark.
  • (surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.
  • (rail transport) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.
  • (cricket) the number of runs that the side batting last needs to score in the final innings in order to win
  • (linguistics) The tenor of a metaphor.
  • (translation studies) The translated version of a document, or the language into which translation occurs.
  • A person (or group of people) that a person or organization is trying to employ or to have as a customer, audience etc.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Gary Cahill, a target for Arsenal and Tottenham before the transfer window closed, put England ahead early on and Rooney was on target twice before the interval as the early hostility of the Bulgarian supporters was swiftly subdued.}}

    Derived terms

    * targeter * targeting

    Synonyms

    * See also * (translated version) target language

    Coordinate terms

    * (translated version) source

    Verb

  • To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).
  • (figuratively) To aim for as an audience or demographic.
  • The advertising campaign targeted older women.
  • (computing) To produce code suitable for.
  • This cross-platform compiler can target any of several processors.

    See also

    *

    object

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A thing that has physical existence.
  • The goal, end or purpose of something.
  • * 2000, Phyllis Barkas Goldman & John Grigni, Monkeyshines on Ancient Cultures
  • The object of tlachtli was to keep the rubber ball from touching the ground while trying to push it to the opponent's endline.
  • (grammar) The noun phrase which is an internal complement of a verb phrase or a prepositional phrase. In a verb phrase with a transitive action verb, it is typically the receiver of the action.
  • A person or thing toward which an emotion is directed.
  • Mary Jane had been the object of Peter's affection for years.
    The convertible, once object''' of his desire, was now the '''object of his hatred.
  • (computing) In object-oriented programming, an instantiation of a class or structure.
  • (obsolete) Sight; show; appearance; aspect.
  • * Chapman
  • He, advancing close / Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose / In glorious object .
    (Shakespeare)

    Synonyms

    * (thing) article, item, thing * (person or thing toward which an emotion is directed) target * See also

    Derived terms

    * art object * celestial object * deep-sky object * depicted object * direct object * exponential object * first-class object * foreign object * found object * function object * God object * Herbig-Haro object * immutable object * indirect object * initial object * Kuiper belt object/KBO * mental object * Messier object * mock object * mutable object * natural object * null object * object ball * object blindness * object code * object complement * object glass * object language * object lens * object lesson * object orientation * object pronoun * object space * object-control * objecthood * objectify * objectionable * objective * object-oriented * physical object * prepositional object * retained object * second-class object * sex object * superluminal object * terminal object * third-class object * unidentified flying object/UFO

    See also

    * subject

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To disagree with something or someone; especially in a Court of Law, to raise an objection.
  • I object to the proposal to build a new airport terminal.
  • (obsolete) To offer in opposition as a criminal charge or by way of accusation or reproach; to adduce as an objection or adverse reason.
  • * Spenser
  • He gave to him to object his heinous crime.
  • * Addison
  • Others object the poverty of the nation.
  • * Whitgift
  • The book giveth liberty to object any crime against such as are to be ordered.
  • (obsolete) To set before or against; to bring into opposition; to oppose.
  • * Fairfax
  • Of less account some knight thereto object , / Whose loss so great and harmful can not prove.
  • * Hooker
  • some strong impediment or other objecting itself
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Pallas to their eyes / The mist objected , and condensed the skies.

    Derived terms

    * objection