Dally vs Tally - What's the difference?

dally | tally |


As verbs the difference between dally and tally

is that dally is to waste time in voluptuous pleasures, or in idleness; to trifle while tally is to count something.

As nouns the difference between dally and tally

is that dally is several wraps of rope around the saddle horn, used to stop animals in while tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As an adjective tally is

(label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dally

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl)

Verb

  • To waste time in voluptuous pleasures, or in idleness; to trifle.
  • * Calamy
  • We have trifled too long already; it is madness to dally any longer.
  • * Barrow
  • We have put off God, and dallied with his grace.
  • To interchange caresses, especially of a sexual nature; to use fondling; to wanton; to sport (compare dalliance)
  • * Shakespeare
  • Not dallying with a brace of courtesans.
  • To delay unnecessarily; to while away.
  • To wind the lasso rope (ie throw-rope) around the saddle horn (the saddle horn is attached to the pommel of a western style saddle) after the roping of an animal
  • * 2003 , Jameson Parker, An Accidental Cowboy , page 89:
  • The end of the top rope he dallied around the gooseneck trailer hitch.
    Synonyms
    * dilly-dally

    Etymology 2

    Possibly from (etyl) "da le la vuelta ! " ("twist it around !") by law of Hobson-Jobson.

    Noun

    (dallies)
  • Several wraps of rope around the saddle horn, used to stop animals in .
  • * 1947 - Bruce Kiskaddon, Rhymes and Ranches
  • What matters is now if he tied hard and fast, / Or tumbled his steer with a dally .

    tally

    English

    Etymology 1

    .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (label) Used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).
  • Up and over to victory! Tally ho!

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • Target sighted.
  • ''(Air Traffic Control): Speedbird 123, New York, traffic at two o’clock, seven miles, a Boeing 737, west-bound, at 4000 feet.”
    (Pilot): New York, Speedbird 123, tally .

    Usage notes

    In aviation radio usage, more common than original (m). In civilian aviation usage, the official term for “traffic sighted” is “traffic in sight”.Federal Aviation Administration: Pilot/Controller Glossary (P/CG)], [https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/pcg/T.HTM T (Traffic)

    Synonyms

    * (target sighted) (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) tallie, from (etyl)

    Noun

    (tallies)
  • Originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;
  • Later, one of two books, sheets of paper, etc., on which corresponding accounts were kept.
  • Hence, any account or score kept by notches or marks, whether on wood or paper, or in a book, especially one kept in duplicate.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 2 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Bulgaria 0-3 England , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Bulgaria, inevitably, raised the tempo in the opening moments of the second half and keeper Joe Hart was forced into his first meaningful action to block a deflected corner - but England were soon threatening to add to their goal tally .}}
  • One thing made to suit another; a match; a mate.
  • * Dryden
  • They were framed the tallies for each other.
  • A notch, mark, or score made on or in a tally; as, to make or earn a score or tally in a game.
  • A tally shop.
  • Verb

  • To count something.
  • To record something by making marks.
  • To make things correspond or agree with each other.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • They are not so well tallied to the present juncture.
  • To keep score.
  • To correspond or agree.
  • * Addison
  • I found pieces of tiles that exactly tallied with the channel.
  • * Walpole
  • Your idea tallies exactly with mine.
  • (nautical) To check off, as parcels of freight going inboard or outboard.
  • Etymology 3

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (obsolete) In a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.
  • (Beaumont and Fletcher)

    References