Ailed vs Tailed - What's the difference?

ailed | tailed |


As verbs the difference between ailed and tailed

is that ailed is (ail) while tailed is (tail).

As an adjective tailed is

(in combination ) having the specified form of tail.

ailed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (ail)
  • Anagrams

    *

    ail

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (obsolete) Painful; troublesome.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cause to suffer; to trouble, afflict. (Now chiefly in interrogative or indefinite constructions.)
  • Have some chicken soup. It's good for what ails you.
  • * Bible, Genesis xxi. 17
  • What aileth thee, Hagar?
  • * 2011 , "Connubial bliss in America", The Economist :
  • Not content with having in 1996 put a Defence of Marriage Act (DOMA) on the statue book, Congress has now begun to hold hearings on a Respect for Marriage Act. Defended, respected: what could possibly ail marriage in America?
  • To be ill; to suffer; to be troubled.
  • * Richardson
  • When he ails ever so little he is so peevish.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An ailment; trouble; illness.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The awn of barley or other types of corn.
  • Anagrams

    * * ----

    tailed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tail)
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • (in combination ) having the specified form of tail
  • It is a species of long-tailed mouse.
  • Having a tail.
  • There are several tailed species of mammals.

    Derived terms

    * tailed frog

    Anagrams

    * *