Stive vs Swive - What's the difference?

stive | swive |


In lang=en terms the difference between stive and swive

is that stive is to be stifled or suffocated while swive is to copulate with (a woman).

As verbs the difference between stive and swive

is that stive is to be stifled or suffocated while swive is to copulate with (a woman).

As a noun stive

is (obsolete) a stew.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

stive

English

Noun

  • (obsolete) A stew.
  • The floating dust in a flour mill caused by the operation of grinding.
  • (De Colange)
  • * 1867 , The British Farmer's Magazine , Volum LII, New Series, page 231,
  • The removal of the heated air, steam, stive , and flour from the millstones, is a proposition which does not appear to be more than sufficiently well understood.

    Derived terms

    * stive-box, stive-room

    Verb

    (stiv)
  • To be stifled or suffocated.
  • To compress, to cram; to make close and hot; to render stifling.
  • * Sir H. Wotton
  • His chamber was commonly stived with friends or suitors of one kind or other.
  • * 1796 , Amelia Simmons, , 1996 Bicentennial Facsimile Edition, page 64,
  • Let your cucumbers be ?mall, fre?h gathered, and free from ?pots; then make a pickle of ?alt and water, ?trong enough to bear an egg; boil the pickle and ?kim it well, and then pour it upon your cucumbers, and ?tive them down for twenty four hours;.
  • * 1836 , T. S. Davis (editor), Kitchen Poetry'', ''Every Body's Album , Volume 1, page 172,
  • And here I mist stay, / In this stived up kitchen to work all day.
  • * 1851 , , Margaret: A Tale of the Real and Ideal, Blight and Bloom , 1871, page 284,
  • "Things are a good deal stived up," answered the Deacon.
    ----

    swive

    English

    Verb

    (swiv)
  • To copulate with (a woman).
  • * c.1674 , John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, A Satyr on Charles II
  • 'Tis sure the sauciest prick that e'er did swive
  • * 2005 , Sophia B. Johnson, Risk Everything :
  • “You were in such heat to swive me, you tore the clothes from your body.”
  • * 2008 , Sarah McKerrigan, Lady Danger :
  • He didn't intend to swive her here in the tiltyard, did he? Surely he was not so heathen as that.
  • * 2009 , Bernard Cornwell, Gallows Thief :
  • His mother was a holy damned fool and swiving her was like rogering a prayerful mouse, and the bloody fool thinks he's taken after her, but he hasn't.
  • (dialectal) To cut a crop in a sweeping or rambling manner, hence to reap; cut for harvest.
  • * 1815 , Walter Davies, Board of Agriculture, Agricultural Surveys: pts. 1-2. South Wales (1815) , page 426
  • The cradled scythes of the Vale of Towey were scarcely known in the Vale of Teivy; and the swiving method of reaping wheat in the latter, was as little known in the former ...
  • * 1815 , Walter Davies, Board of Agriculture, General view of the agriculture and domestic economy of South Wales, Volume 1 , page 425
  • Swiving is a method first adopted apparently in Cardiganshire ...
  • * 1905 , Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary , page 893
  • swive' ... to cut grain or beans with a broad hook; to mow with a reaping-hook ... "swiver": a reaper who "' swives " the grain
  • * 1929 , Mary Gladys Meredith Webb, Precious Bane
  • We started swiving , that is reaping, at the beginning of August-month, and we left the stooks [stalks] standing in the fields ...
  • * 1955 , Ceredigion Historical Society, Ceredigion: Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Association - Volumes 2-3 , page 160
  • Moreover, according to Walter Davies "swiving " was a method of reaping first adopted in Cardiganshire.

    Derived terms

    * (l) (noun)

    Anagrams

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