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Shed vs Sweat - What's the difference?

shed | sweat |

In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between shed and sweat

is that shed is (archaic) to pour; to make flow while sweat is (archaic) to remove a portion of (a coin), as by shaking it with others in a bag, so that the friction wears off a small quantity of the metal.

In lang=en terms the difference between shed and sweat

is that shed is to radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on while sweat is to emit moisture.

As verbs the difference between shed and sweat

is that shed is (transitive|obsolete|uk|dialect) to part or divide while sweat is to emit sweat.

As nouns the difference between shed and sweat

is that shed is (weaving) an area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven or shed can be a slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut while sweat is fluid that exits the body through pores in the skin usually due to physical stress and/or high temperature for the purpose of regulating body temperature and removing certain compounds from the circulation.

shed

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) sheden, scheden, schoden, from (etyl) 'he cuts off'). Related to (l); (l).

Verb

  • (transitive, obsolete, UK, dialect) To part or divide.
  • A metal comb shed her golden hair.
    (Robert of Brunne)
  • (ambitransitive) To part with, separate from, leave off; cast off, let fall, be divested of.
  • You must shed your fear of the unknown before you can proceed.
    When we found the snake, it was in the process of shedding its skin.
  • * Mortimer
  • White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.
  • * 2012 November 2, Ken Belson, "[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/03/sports/new-york-city-marathon-will-not-be-held-sunday.html?hp&_r=0]," New York Times (retrieved 2 November 2012):
  • She called on all the marathoners to go to Staten Island to help with the clean-up effort and to bring the clothes they would have shed at the start to shelters or other places where displaced people were in need.
  • (archaic) To pour; to make flow.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood?
  • To allow to flow or fall.
  • I didn't shed many tears when he left me.
    A tarpaulin sheds water.
  • To radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on.
  • Can you shed any light on this problem?
  • (obsolete) To pour forth, give off, impart.
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , Acts II:
  • Sence now that he by the right honde of god exalted is, and hath receaved off the father the promys off the holy goost, he hath sheed forthe that which ye nowe se and heare.
  • (obsolete) To fall in drops; to pour.
  • * Chaucer
  • Such a rain down from the welkin shadde .
  • To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • Her hair is shed with grey.
  • (weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) schede, schode, (m), .

    Alternative forms

    * (dialectal) * (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (weaving) An area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven.
  • (obsolete) A distinction or dividing-line.
  • (obsolete) A parting in the hair.
  • (obsolete) An area of land as distinguished from those around it.
  • Derived terms
    * watershed

    Etymology 3

    Variant of shade .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut.
  • a wagon shed'''; a wood '''shed'''; a garden '''shed
  • (British, derogatory, informal) An automobile which is old, worn-out, slow, or otherwise of poor quality.
  • (British, rail transportation) A locomotive.
  • *'>citation
  • Derived terms
    * * * * *

    See also

    * cabin * hovel * hut * kiosk * outbuilding * pergola * shack * shanty * stall * storehouse

    sweat

    English

    (wikipedia sweat)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • Fluid that exits the body through pores in the skin usually due to physical stress and/or high temperature for the purpose of regulating body temperature and removing certain compounds from the circulation.
  • (British, slang, military slang, especially WWI) A soldier (especially one who is old or experienced).
  • (historical) The sweating sickness.
  • * 2009 , Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall , Fourth Estate 2010, page 131:
  • When the sweat comes back this summer, 1528, people say, as they did last year, that you won't get it if you don't think about it.
    (Holinshed)
  • Moisture issuing from any substance.
  • the sweat of hay or grain in a mow or stack
    (Mortimer)
  • A short run by a racehorse as a form of exercise.
  • Synonyms
    * (fluid that exits the body through pores) perspiration * sudor
    Derived terms
    * break a sweat * cold sweat * no sweat * old sweat * sweat gland * sweatshirt * sweatshop * sweaty

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . Compare Dutch zweten, German schwitzen, Danish svede.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To emit sweat.
  • To cause to excrete moisture from the skin; to cause to perspire.
  • His physicians attempted to sweat him by most powerful sudorifics.
  • (informal) To work hard.
  • I've been sweating over my essay all day.
  • (informal) To extract money, labour, etc. from, by exaction or oppression.
  • to sweat''' a spendthrift; to '''sweat labourers
  • (informal) To worry.
  • (colloquial) To worry about (something).
  • * 2010 , Brooks Barnes, "Studios battle to save Narnia", The New York Times , 5 Dec 2010:
  • There are few matters studio executives sweat more than maintaining their franchises.
  • To emit, in the manner of sweat.
  • to sweat blood
  • * Dryden
  • With exercise she sweat ill humors out.
  • To emit moisture.
  • The cheese will start sweating if you don't refrigerate it.
  • (plumbing) To solder (a pipe joint) together.
  • (slang) To stress out.
  • Stop sweatin' me!
  • (intransitive) To cook slowly in shallow oil without browning.
  • (archaic) To remove a portion of (a coin), as by shaking it with others in a bag, so that the friction wears off a small quantity of the metal.
  • * R. Cobden
  • The only use of it [money] which is interdicted is to put it in circulation again after having diminished its weight by sweating , or otherwise, because the quantity of metal contains is no longer consistent with its impression.
    Synonyms
    * (emit sweat) perspire * (work hard) slave, slog, work hard * (to worry) fret, worry
    Derived terms
    * sweat like a pig * sweater * (l) * unsweat

    Anagrams

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