Adequate vs Suspense - What's the difference?

adequate | suspense |


As adjectives the difference between adequate and suspense

is that adequate is while suspense is (obsolete) held or lifted up; held or prevented from proceeding.

As a noun suspense is

the condition of being suspended; cessation for a time.

adequate

English

Alternative forms

* (archaic)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Equal to some requirement; proportionate, or correspondent; fully sufficient; as, powers adequate to a great work; an adequate definition lawfully and physically sufficient.
  • * De Quincey
  • Ireland had no adequate champion.
  • * Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of the Empty House
  • All day, as I drove upon my round, I turned over the case in my mind and found no explanation which appeared to me to be adequate .

    Antonyms

    * inadequate

    Verb

    (adequat)
  • (obsolete) To equalize; to make adequate.
  • (Fotherby)
  • (obsolete) To equal.
  • It [is] an impossibility for any creature to adequate God in his eternity. — Shelford.

    suspense

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Noun

    (-)
  • The condition of being suspended; cessation for a time.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • a cool suspense from pleasure and from pain
  • the pleasurable emotion of anticipation and excitement regarding the outcome or climax of a book, film etc.
  • The unpleasant emotion of anxiety or apprehension in an uncertain situation.
  • * Denham
  • Ten days the prophet in suspense remained.
  • (legal) A temporary cessation of one's right; suspension, as when the rent or other profits of land cease by unity of possession of land and rent.
  • Derived terms

    * suspenseful

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Held or lifted up; held or prevented from proceeding.
  • * Milton
  • [The great light of day] suspense in heaven.
  • (obsolete) Expressing, or proceeding from, suspense or doubt.
  • * Milton
  • Expectation held his look suspense .
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