Standover vs Supervise - What's the difference?

standover | supervise |


As a noun standover

is the height above ground of the top horizontal tube of the frame of a bicycle; should be less than the height above ground of the rider's groin.

As an adjective standover

is using intimidation or threat of force to coerce others into submission or compliance eg "standover tactics" or "standover man".

As a verb supervise is

.

standover

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • the height above ground of the top horizontal tube of the frame of a bicycle; should be less than the height above ground of the rider's groin
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • using intimidation or threat of force to coerce others into submission or compliance. e.g. "standover tactics" or "standover man".
  • supervise

    English

    Verb

    (supervis)
  • To direct, manage, or oversee; to be in charge
  • *, chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.}}
  • (obsolete) To look over so as to read; to peruse.
  • * 1590 , , IV. ii. 120:
  • Let me supervise the canzonet.