Censor vs Supervise - What's the difference?

censor | supervise |


As verbs the difference between censor and supervise

is that censor is to review in order to remove objectionable content from correspondence or public media, either by legal criteria or with discretionary powers while supervise is .

As a noun censor

is (history) a roman magistrate, originally a census administrator, by classical times a high judge of public behavior and morality.

censor

English

Alternative forms

* censour (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (history) A Roman magistrate, originally a census administrator, by Classical times a high judge of public behavior and morality
  • The Ancient censors were part of the ''cursus honorum , a series of public offices held during a political career, like consuls and praetors.
  • An official responsible for the removal of objectionable or sensitive content
  • The headmaster is an even stricter censor''' for his boarding pupils' correspondence than the enemy ' censors had been for his own when the country was occupied.
  • One who censures or condemns
  • (psychology) A hypothetical subconscious agency which filters unacceptable thought before it reaches the conscious
  • (acronym ) Censors Ensure No Secrets Over Radios
  • Synonyms

    * censurer

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To review in order to remove objectionable content from correspondence or public media, either by legal criteria or with discretionary powers
  • The man responsible for censoring films has seen some things in his time.
  • To remove objectionable content
  • ''Occupying powers typically censor anything reeking of resistance

    Synonyms

    * bowdlerize

    See also

    * decensor * expurgate

    Anagrams

    * ----

    supervise

    English

    Verb

    (supervis)
  • To direct, manage, or oversee; to be in charge
  • *, chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.}}
  • (obsolete) To look over so as to read; to peruse.
  • * 1590 , , IV. ii. 120:
  • Let me supervise the canzonet.