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Sublime vs Supernatural - What's the difference?

sublime | supernatural |

As a verb sublime

is .

As an adjective supernatural is

above nature; that which is beyond or added to nature, often so considered because it is given by a deity or some force beyond that which humans are born with in roman catholic theology, is considered to be a supernatural addition to human nature.

As a noun supernatural is

(countable) a supernatural being.

sublime

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), from (etyl) .

Verb

(sublim)
  • (chemistry, physics) To sublimate.
  • To raise on high.
  • * E. P. Whipple
  • A soul sublimed by an idea above the region of vanity and conceit.
  • To exalt; to heighten; to improve; to purify.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The sun / Which not alone the southern wit sublimes , / But ripens spirits in cold, northern climes.
  • To dignify; to ennoble.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • An ordinary gift cannot sublime a person to a supernatural employment.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Noble and majestic.
  • * De Quincey
  • the sublime Julian leader
  • Impressive and awe-inspiring.
  • sublime''' scenery; a '''sublime deed
  • * Prior
  • Easy in words thy style, in sense sublime .
  • * Longfellow
  • Know how sublime a thing it is / To suffer and be strong.
  • (obsolete) Lifted up; high in place; exalted aloft; uplifted; lofty.
  • * Dryden
  • Sublime on these a tower of steel is reared.
  • (obsolete) Elevated by joy; elated.
  • * Milton
  • Their hearts were jocund and sublime , / Drunk with idolatry, drunk with wine.
  • Lofty of mien; haughty; proud.
  • * Spenser
  • countenance sublime and insolent
  • * Milton
  • His fair, large front and eye sublime declared / Absolute rule.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something sublime.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    supernatural

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Above nature; that which is beyond or added to nature, often so considered because it is given by a deity or some force beyond that which humans are born with. In Roman Catholic theology, is considered to be a supernatural addition to human nature.
  • Not of the usual; not natural; altered by forces that are not understood fully if at all.
  • The house is haunted by supernatural forces.
  • Neither visible nor measurable.
  • Synonyms

    * extraordinary, paranormal, preternatural, supranatural, unnatural

    Antonyms

    * ordinary * natural

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) A supernatural being.
  • (uncountable) Supernatural beings and events collectively.
  • * 2012 , Blake Morrison, The Guardian , [http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jul/20/blake-morrison-under-the-witches-spell?INTCMP=SRCH]:
  • Dr Johnson defended Shakespeare's use of the supernatural from the charge of implausibility on the grounds that, "The reality of witchcraft … has in all ages and countries been credited by the common people, and in most by the learned."