Tincture vs Suffuse - What's the difference?

tincture | suffuse | Related terms |

Tincture is a related term of suffuse.


As verbs the difference between tincture and suffuse

is that tincture is to stain or impregnate (something) with colour while suffuse is to spread through or over something, especially as a liquid, colour or light; to perfuse.

As a noun tincture

is a pigment or other substance that colours or dyes.

tincture

Noun

(en noun)
  • A pigment or other substance that colours or dyes.
  • A tint, or an added colour.
  • (heraldry) A colour or metal used in the depiction of a coat of arms.
  • An alcoholic extract of plant material, used as a medicine.
  • (humorous) A small alcoholic drink.
  • An essential characteristic.
  • * 1924 , ARISTOTLE. . Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001. Book 1, Part 6.
  • for the earlier thinkers had no tincture of dialectic
  • The finer and more volatile parts of a substance, separated by a solvent; an extract of a part of the substance of a body communicated to the solvent.
  • A slight taste superadded to any substance.
  • a tincture of orange peel
  • A slight quality added to anything; a tinge.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • All manners take a tincture from our own.
  • * Macaulay
  • Every man had a slight tincture of soldiership, and scarcely any man more than a slight tincture.

    Verb

    (tinctur)
  • to stain or impregnate (something) with colour
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    suffuse

    English

    Verb

    (suffus)
  • To spread through or over something, especially as a liquid, colour or light; to perfuse.
  • The entire room was suffused with a golden light.
  • (figuratively) To spread through or over in the manner of a liquid.
  • The warmth suffused his cold fingers.

    Usage notes

    The verb is often used in the passive voice.

    Synonyms

    * diffuse

    Derived terms

    * suffusion * suffusive ----