Drench vs Suffuse - What's the difference?

drench | suffuse | Related terms |

Drench is a related term of suffuse.


As verbs the difference between drench and suffuse

is that drench is to soak, to make very wet while suffuse is to spread through or over something, especially as a liquid, colour or light; to perfuse.

As a noun drench

is a draught administered to an animal or drench can be (obsolete|uk) a military vassal, mentioned in the domesday book.

drench

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) drenchen, from (etyl) . More at drink.

Noun

(es)
  • A draught administered to an animal.
  • (obsolete) A drink; a draught; specifically, a potion of medicine poured or forced down the throat; also, a potion that causes purging.
  • * Dryden
  • A drench of wine.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Give my roan horse a drench .

    Verb

  • To soak, to make very wet.
  • * Dryden
  • Now dam the ditches and the floods restrain; / Their moisture has already drenched the plain.
  • To cause to drink; especially, to dose (e.g. a horse) with medicine by force.
  • Etymology 2

    Anglo-Saxon dreng warrior, soldier, akin to Icelandic drengr.

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete, UK) A military vassal, mentioned in the Domesday Book.
  • (Burrill)

    suffuse

    English

    Verb

    (suffus)
  • To spread through or over something, especially as a liquid, colour or light; to perfuse.
  • The entire room was suffused with a golden light.
  • (figuratively) To spread through or over in the manner of a liquid.
  • The warmth suffused his cold fingers.

    Usage notes

    The verb is often used in the passive voice.

    Synonyms

    * diffuse

    Derived terms

    * suffusion * suffusive ----