Satiate vs Suffonsify - What's the difference?

satiate | suffonsify |


As verbs the difference between satiate and suffonsify

is that satiate is to fill to satisfaction; to satisfy while suffonsify is (canada|informal|uncommon) to satisfy or satiate, particularly the appetite.

As an adjective satiate

is filled to satisfaction or to excess.

satiate

English

Verb

(satiat)
  • To fill to satisfaction; to satisfy.
  • Nothing seemed to satiate her desire for knowledge.
  • To satisfy to excess. To fill to satiety.
  • Usage notes

    Used interchangeably with, and more common than, sate.Monthly Gleanings: November 2011]: Sate'' versus ''satiated''.”, ''[http://blog.oup.com/ OUPblog

    Synonyms

    * sate

    Derived terms

    * satiated

    References

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Filled to satisfaction or to excess.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • satiate of applause

    suffonsify

    English

    Alternative forms

    * sophonsify

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (Canada, informal, uncommon) To satisfy or satiate, particularly the appetite.
  • * 1953 , , Always The Young Strangers , Harcourt Brace (1953), ISBN 978-0156047654, page 243:
  • Toward the end of a dinner of prime roast beef, baked potato, salad, apple pie, and coffee, Sam Barlow would ask, "Well, young man, do you think you have had sufficient to suffonsify ?"