Perk vs Subsidy - What's the difference?

perk | subsidy |


In dated|lang=en terms the difference between perk and subsidy

is that perk is (dated) to peer; to look inquisitively while subsidy is (dated) money granted by parliament to the british crown.

As nouns the difference between perk and subsidy

is that perk is perquisite or perk can be a percolator, particularly of coffee while subsidy is financial support or assistance, such as a grant.

As a verb perk

is shortened form of percolate or perk can be to become more lively or enthusiastic or perk can be (dated) to peer; to look inquisitively.

As an adjective perk

is smart; trim; spruce; jaunty; vain.

perk

English

Etymology 1

From perquisite, by abbreviation.

Alternative forms

* (l) (less common)

Noun

(en noun)
  • Perquisite.
  • Free coffee is one of the perks of the job.

    Etymology 2

    From percolate (verb) and percolator (noun), by abbreviation.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • Shortened form of percolate.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A percolator, particularly of coffee.
  • Etymology 3

    The origin is .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To become more lively or enthusiastic.
  • To exalt oneself; to bear oneself loftily.
  • * Barrow
  • to perk over them
  • To make trim or smart; to straighten up; to erect; to make a jaunty or saucy display of.
  • to perk''' the ears; to '''perk up one's head
    (Cowper)
    (Sherburne)
    Derived terms
    * perk up * perky

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • smart; trim; spruce; jaunty; vain
  • * Spenser
  • Perk as a peacock.

    Etymology 4

    The origin is .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (dated) To peer; to look inquisitively.
  • (Charles Dickens)
    ----

    subsidy

    Noun

    (subsidies)
  • Financial support or assistance, such as a grant.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist), author=Lexington
  • , title= Keeping the mighty honest , passage=British journalists shun complete respectability, feeling a duty to be ready to savage the mighty, or rummage through their bins. Elsewhere in Europe, government contracts and subsidies ensure that press barons will only defy the mighty so far.}}
  • (dated) Money granted by parliament to the British Crown.
  • Antonyms

    * tax