Thing vs Subject - What's the difference?

thing | subject | Related terms |

Thing is a related term of subject.


As nouns the difference between thing and subject

is that thing is (chiefly|historical) a public assembly or judicial council in a germanic country while subject is (label) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As an adjective subject is

likely to be affected by or to experience something.

As a verb subject is

to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

thing

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • That which is considered to exist as a separate entity, object, quality or concept.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=48, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about […], or offering services that let you […], "share the things you love with the world" and so on. But the real way to build a successful online business is to be better than your rivals at undermining people's control of their own attention.}}
  • A word, symbol, sign, or other referent that can be used to refer to any entity.
  • An individual object or distinct entity.
  • (informal) Something that is normal or generally recognised.
  • (legal) Whatever can be owned.
  • The latest fad or fashion.
  • (in the plural) Clothes, possessions or equipment.
  • (informal) A unit or container, usually containing edible goods.
  • (informal) A problem, dilemma, or complicating factor.
  • (slang) A penis.
  • * 1959 , , (Naked Lunch) , 50th anniversary edition (2009), p. 126:
  • “Oh Gertie it’s true. It’s all true. They’ve got a horrid gash instead of a thrilling thing .”
  • A living being or creature.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Revenge of the nerds , passage=Think of banking today and the image is of grey-suited men in towering skyscrapers. Its future, however, is being shaped in converted warehouses and funky offices in San Francisco, New York and London, where bright young things in jeans and T-shirts huddle around laptops, sipping lattes or munching on free food.}}
  • That which matters; the crux.
  • * 1914 , Eugene Gladstone O'Neill, The Movie Man] [playscript:
  • Don’t forget to have Gomez postpone that shooting thing . (in reference to the execution of Fernandez)
  • (chiefly, historical) A public assembly or judicial council in a Germanic country.
  • * 1974 , Jón Jóhannesson, A History of the Old Icelandic Commonwealth: Íslendinga Saga , translated by Haraldur Bessason, page 46:
  • In accordance with Old Germanic custom men came to the thing fully armed, [...]
  • * 1974', Jakob Benediktsson, ''Landnám og upphaf allsherjarríkis'', in ''Saga Íslands'', quoted in '''1988 by Jesse L. Byock in ''Medieval Iceland: Society, Sagas, and Power , page 85:
  • The goðar'' seem both to have received payment of ''thing-fararkaup from those who stayed home and at the same time compensated those who went to the thing , and it cannot be seen whether they had any profit from these transactions.
  • * 1988 , Jesse L. Byock, Medieval Iceland: Society, Sagas, and Power , page 59:
  • All Icelandic things were skap-thing , meaning that they were governed by established procedure and met at regular legally designated intevals at predetermined meeting places.

    Quotations

    * 1611 — (King James Version of the Bible), 1:1 *: Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us...

    Synonyms

    * stuff (uncountable equivalent) * item * yoke (Ireland)

    Derived terms

    * anything * bright young thing * everything * here's the thing * nothing * see things * something * sweet young thing * swing of things * the thing is * thingal * thingamajig * thinger * thinghood * thingly * thingness * thingo * thingy *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (rare) To express as a thing; to reify.
  • Statistics

    *

    subject

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Likely to be affected by or to experience something.
  • a country subject to extreme heat
  • * Dryden
  • All human things are subject to decay.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them
  • Conditional upon.
  • Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.
  • (Spenser)
  • Placed under the power of another; owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state.
  • * John Locke
  • Esau was never subject to Jacob.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) In a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with. In active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.
  • The main topic of a paper, work of art, discussion, field of study, etc.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • the subject for heroic song
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Make choice of a subject , beautiful and noble, which shall afford an ample field of matter wherein to expatiate.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • the unhappy subject of these quarrels
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=5 citation , passage=Then I had a good think on the subject of the hocussing of Cigarette, and I was reluctantly bound to admit that once again the man in the corner had found the only possible solution to the mystery.}}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=5, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=The departure was not unduly prolonged.
  • A particular area of study.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains.
  • A citizen in a monarchy.
  • A person ruled over by another, especially a monarch or state authority.
  • (label) The main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.
  • * (1823-1895)
  • The earliest known form of subject is the ecclesiastical cantus firmus , or plain song.
  • A human, animal or an inanimate object that is being examined, treated, analysed, etc.
  • * (Conyers Middleton) (1683-1750)
  • Writers of particular livesare apt to be prejudiced in favour of their subject .
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. That’s because the lenses that are excellent at magnifying tiny subjects produce a narrow depth of field.}}

    Synonyms

    * (discussion) matter, topic

    Derived terms

    * subject title

    See also

    * object * predicate

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.
  • Synonyms

    *

    Statistics

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