Field vs Subject - What's the difference?

field | subject |


As a proper noun field

is .

As an adjective subject is

likely to be affected by or to experience something.

As a noun subject is

(label) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As a verb subject is

to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

field

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A land area free of woodland, cities, and towns; open country.
  • A wide, open space that is usually used to grow crops or to hold farm animals.
  • * (Lord Byron) (1788-1824)
  • fields which promise corn and wine
  • *{{quote-book, year=1927, author= F. E. Penny
  • , chapter=5, title= Pulling the Strings , passage=Anstruther laughed good-naturedly. “[…] I shall take out half a dozen intelligent maistries from our Press and get them to give our villagers instruction when they begin work and when they are in the fields .”}}
  • The open country near or belonging to a town or city—usually used in plural.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=I corralled the judge, and we started off across the fields , in no very mild state of fear of that gentleman's wife, whose vigilance was seldom relaxed. And thus we came by a circuitous route to Mohair, the judge occupied by his own guilty thoughts, and I by others not less disturbing.}}
  • A physical phenomenon, such as force, potential, or fluid velocity, that pervades a region.
  • (senseid)A course of study or domain of knowledge or practice.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-10, author=Audrey Garric
  • , volume=188, issue=22, page=30, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Urban canopies let nature bloom , passage=As towns continue to grow, replanting vegetation has become a form of urban utopia and green roofs are spreading fast. Last year 1m square metres of plant-covered roofing was built in France, as much as in the US, and 10 times more than in Germany, the pioneer in this field .}}
  • An area that can be seen at a given time.
  • (senseid)A place where a battle is fought; a battlefield.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • this glorious and well-foughten field
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • What though the field be lost?
  • An area reserved for playing a game.
  • A realm of practical, direct, or natural operation, contrasting with an office, classroom, or laboratory.
  • (senseid)(label) A commutative ring with identity for which every non element has a multiplicative inverse.
  • (label) A region containing a particular mineral.
  • (label) The background of the shield.
  • (label) An area of memory or storage reserved for a particular value.
  • A component of a database record in which a single unit of information is stored.
  • A physical or virtual location for the input of information in the form of characters.
  • The team in a match that throws the ball and tries to catch it when it is hit by the other team (the bat).
  • (label) The outfield.
  • An unrestricted or favourable opportunity for action, operation, or achievement.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • afforded a clear field for moral experiments
  • All of the competitors in any outdoor contest or trial, or all except the favourites in the betting.
  • Synonyms

    * (course of study or domain of knowledge) area, domain, sphere, realm * (area reserved for playing a game) course (for golf), court (for racquet sports), ground, pitch

    Hypernyms

    * (algebra) Euclidean domain ⊂ principal ideal domain ⊂ unique factorization domain, Noetherian domain ⊂ integral domain ⊂ commutative ring

    Hyponyms

    * (algebra) ordered field, Pythagorean field

    Derived terms

    * center field * fieldwork * field marshal * field theory * finite field * field seam * infield * left field * number field * outfield * play the field * quadratic field * right field * scalar field * semantic field * splitting field * vector field

    Usage notes

    In the mathematical sense, some languages, such as French, use a term that literally means "body". This denotes a division ring or skew field, not necessarily commutative. If it is clear from context that the quaternions and similar division rings are irrelevant, or that all division rings being considered are finite and therefore fields, this difference is ignored.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (sports) To intercept or catch (a ball) and play it.
  • (baseball, softball, cricket, and other batting sports) To be the team catching and throwing the ball, as opposed to hitting it.
  • The blue team are fielding first, while the reds are batting.
  • (sports) To place a team in (a game).
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=August 23 , author=Alasdair Lamont , title=Hearts 0-1 Liverpool , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=On balance, it was harsh on Hearts, who had given as good as they got against their more-fancied opponents, who, despite not being at full strength, fielded a multi-million pound team.}}
    The away team field ed two new players and the second-choice goalkeeper.
  • To answer; to address.
  • She will field questions immediately after her presentation.
  • To defeat.
  • Synonyms

    * * * address, answer, deal with, respond to

    Antonyms

    * (be the team throwing and catching the ball) bat

    See also

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * *

    References

    * [http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=field&searchmode=none] - Etymology of "field"

    subject

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Likely to be affected by or to experience something.
  • a country subject to extreme heat
  • * Dryden
  • All human things are subject to decay.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them
  • Conditional upon.
  • Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.
  • (Spenser)
  • Placed under the power of another; owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state.
  • * John Locke
  • Esau was never subject to Jacob.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) In a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with. In active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.
  • The main topic of a paper, work of art, discussion, field of study, etc.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • the subject for heroic song
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Make choice of a subject , beautiful and noble, which shall afford an ample field of matter wherein to expatiate.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • the unhappy subject of these quarrels
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=5 citation , passage=Then I had a good think on the subject of the hocussing of Cigarette, and I was reluctantly bound to admit that once again the man in the corner had found the only possible solution to the mystery.}}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=5, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=The departure was not unduly prolonged.
  • A particular area of study.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains.
  • A citizen in a monarchy.
  • A person ruled over by another, especially a monarch or state authority.
  • (label) The main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.
  • * (1823-1895)
  • The earliest known form of subject is the ecclesiastical cantus firmus , or plain song.
  • A human, animal or an inanimate object that is being examined, treated, analysed, etc.
  • * (Conyers Middleton) (1683-1750)
  • Writers of particular livesare apt to be prejudiced in favour of their subject .
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. That’s because the lenses that are excellent at magnifying tiny subjects produce a narrow depth of field.}}

    Synonyms

    * (discussion) matter, topic

    Derived terms

    * subject title

    See also

    * object * predicate

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.
  • Synonyms

    *

    Statistics

    *