Branch vs Subject - What's the difference?

branch | subject |


As a proper noun branch

is .

As an adjective subject is

likely to be affected by or to experience something.

As a noun subject is

(label) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As a verb subject is

to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

branch

English

Alternative forms

*

Noun

(es) (wikipedia branch)
  • The woody part of a tree arising from the trunk and usually dividing.
  • Any of the parts of something that divides like the branch of a tree.
  • the branch of an antler, a chandelier, a river, or a railway
  • (geometry) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance.
  • the branches of a hyperbola
  • A location of an organization with several locations.
  • Our main branch is downtown, and we have branches in all major suburbs.
  • A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line.
  • the English branch of a family
  • * Carew
  • his father, a younger branch of the ancient stock
  • (Mormonism) A local congregation of the LDS Church that is not large enough to form a ward; see .
  • An area in business or of knowledge, research.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-01
  • , author=Robert L. Dorit , title=Rereading Darwin , volume=100, issue=1, page=23 , magazine= citation , passage=We live our lives in three dimensions for our threescore and ten allotted years. Yet every branch of contemporary science, from statistics to cosmology, alludes to processes that operate on scales outside of human experience: the millisecond and the nanometer, the eon and the light-year.}}
  • (nautical) A certificate given by (Trinity House) to a pilot qualified to take navigational control of a ship in British waters.
  • (computer architecture) A sequence of .
  • Synonyms

    * (part of a tree) bough, tillow, twig, see also

    Verb

    (es)
  • To arise from the trunk or a larger branch of a tree.
  • To produce branches.
  • To divide into separate parts or subdivisions.
  • (computing) To jump to a different location in a program, especially as the result of a conditional statement.
  • subject

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Likely to be affected by or to experience something.
  • a country subject to extreme heat
  • * Dryden
  • All human things are subject to decay.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them
  • Conditional upon.
  • Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.
  • (Spenser)
  • Placed under the power of another; owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state.
  • * John Locke
  • Esau was never subject to Jacob.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) In a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with. In active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.
  • The main topic of a paper, work of art, discussion, field of study, etc.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • the subject for heroic song
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Make choice of a subject , beautiful and noble, which shall afford an ample field of matter wherein to expatiate.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • the unhappy subject of these quarrels
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=5 citation , passage=Then I had a good think on the subject of the hocussing of Cigarette, and I was reluctantly bound to admit that once again the man in the corner had found the only possible solution to the mystery.}}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=5, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=The departure was not unduly prolonged.
  • A particular area of study.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains.
  • A citizen in a monarchy.
  • A person ruled over by another, especially a monarch or state authority.
  • (label) The main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.
  • * (1823-1895)
  • The earliest known form of subject is the ecclesiastical cantus firmus , or plain song.
  • A human, animal or an inanimate object that is being examined, treated, analysed, etc.
  • * (Conyers Middleton) (1683-1750)
  • Writers of particular livesare apt to be prejudiced in favour of their subject .
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. That’s because the lenses that are excellent at magnifying tiny subjects produce a narrow depth of field.}}

    Synonyms

    * (discussion) matter, topic

    Derived terms

    * subject title

    See also

    * object * predicate

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.
  • Synonyms

    *

    Statistics

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