Yearn vs Strive - What's the difference?

yearn | strive |


As verbs the difference between yearn and strive

is that yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk while strive is to try to achieve a result; to make strenuous effort; to try earnestly and persistently.

As a noun strive is

(obsolete) an effort; a striving.

yearn

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) giernan, from (etyl) .

Verb

(en verb)
  • To long, have a strong desire (for something).
  • * All I yearn for is a simple life.
  • To long for something in the past with melancholy, nostalgically
  • To be pained or distressed; to grieve; to mourn.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Falstaff he is dead, and we must yearn therefore.
  • To pain; to grieve; to vex.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It would yearn your heart to see it.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It yearns me not if men my garments wear.
    Derived terms
    () * yearner * yearnful * yearnly * yearning * yearnsome * yearny

    Etymology 2

    See .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (Scotland) To curdle, as milk.
  • Anagrams

    *

    strive

    English

    Verb

  • To try to achieve a result; to make strenuous effort; to try earnestly and persistently.
  • He strove to excel.
  • To struggle in opposition; to be in contention or dispute; to contend; to contest.
  • to strive against fate
    to strive for the truth
  • * Denham
  • Now private pity strove with public hate, / Reason with rage, and eloquence with fate.
  • To vie; to compete as a rival.
  • * Milton
  • [Not] that sweet grove / Of Daphne, by Orontes and the inspired / Castalian spring, might with this paradise / Of Eden strive .

    Usage notes

    * This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See * The strong or irregular forms "strove" and "striven" are more commonly used in print than "strived".

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An effort; a striving.
  • (Chapman)
  • (obsolete) strife; contention