Pallet vs Stray - What's the difference?

pallet | stray |


As nouns the difference between pallet and stray

is that pallet is a portable platform, usually designed to be easily moved by a forklift, on which goods can be stacked, for transport or storage or pallet can be a straw bed or pallet can be (heraldiccharge) a narrow vertical strip or pallet can be (painting) while stray is any domestic animal that has an enclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray.

As a verb stray is

to wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.

As an adjective stray is

having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.

pallet

English

(wikipedia pallet)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) palet, from (etyl) palete, from (etyl) pallr

Noun

(en noun)
  • a portable platform, usually designed to be easily moved by a forklift, on which goods can be stacked, for transport or storage.
  • (military) A flat base for combining stores or carrying a single item to form a unit load for handling, transportation, and storage by materials handling equipmentJoint Publication 1-02 U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms; 12 April 2001 (As Amended Through 14 April 2006). .
  • (military) (DOD only) 463L pallet – An 88” x 108” aluminum flat base used to facilitate the upload and download of aircraft.
  • Derived terms
    * palletizer

    Etymology 2

    From the (etyl) paillet, from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A straw bed.
  • (By extension from above) A makeshift bed.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) palla: to cut; hence a strip of cloth. The diminutive of the pale.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (heraldiccharge) A narrow vertical strip.
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (painting)
  • * (Robert Southey)
  • The Old Dragon fled when the wonder he spied, / And cursed his own fruitless endeavor; / While the Painter call'd after his rage to deride, / Shook his pallet and brushes in triumph, and cried, / "I'll paint thee more ugly than ever!"
  • * 1860 , Chambers's Information for the People (volume 1, page 203)
  • For example, let a painter's pallet be suspended from the thumb-hole, as in the figure
  • A wooden implement, often oval or round, used by potters, crucible makers, etc., for forming, beating, and rounding their works.
  • A potter's wheel.
  • (gilding) An instrument used to take up gold leaf from the pillow, and to apply it.
  • (gilding) A tool for gilding the backs of books over the bands.
  • (brickmaking) A board on which a newly moulded brick is conveyed to the hack.
  • (Knight)
  • (engineering) A click or pawl for driving a ratchet wheel.
  • (engineering) One of the series of disks or pistons in the chain pump.
  • (Knight)
  • (horology) One of the pieces or levers connected with the pendulum of a clock, or the balance of a watch, which receive the immediate impulse of the scape-wheel, or balance wheel.
  • (music) In the organ, a valve between the wind chest and the mouth of a pipe or row of pipes.
  • (zoology) One of a pair of shelly plates that protect the siphon tubes of certain bivalves, such as the .
  • A cup containing three ounces, formerly used by surgeons.
  • (Webster 1913)

    References

    * The Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd edition, Oxford University Press * Notes:

    stray

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any domestic animal that has an enclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray.
  • (figuratively) One who is lost, either literally or metaphorically.
  • The act of wandering or going astray.
  • (historical) An area of common land or place administered for the use of general domestic animals, i.e. "the stray"
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.
  • * Denham
  • Thames among the wanton valleys strays .
  • To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
  • (figurative) To wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err.
  • * November 2 2014 , Daniel Taylor, " Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United," guardian.co.uk
  • It was a derby that left Manchester United a long way back in Manchester City’s wing-mirrors and, in the worst moments, straying dangerously close to being their own worst enemy.
  • To cause to stray.
  • * 1591 , , V. i. 51:
  • Hath not else his eye / Strayed his affection in unlawful love,

    Synonyms

    * deviate

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.
  • In the wrong place; misplaced.
  • a stray comma

    Derived terms

    * stray line * stray mark

    References

    Anagrams

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