Habit vs Strategy - What's the difference?

habit | strategy |


As nouns the difference between habit and strategy

is that habit is habit while strategy is the science and art of military command as applied to the overall planning and conduct of warfare.

habit

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) ; see have.

Noun

(en noun)
  • An action done on a regular basis.
  • * Washington Irving
  • a man of very shy, retired habits
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits .  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • An action performed repeatedly and automatically, usually without awareness.
  • A long piece of clothing worn by monks and nuns.
  • A piece of clothing worn uniformly for a specific activity.
  • (archaic) Outward appearance; attire; dress.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy.
  • * Addison
  • There are, among the statues, several of Venus, in different habits .
  • * 1719 , (Daniel Defoe), (Robinson Crusoe)
  • it was always my fate to choose for the worse, so I did here; for having money in my pocket and good clothes upon my back, I would always go on board in the habit of a gentleman; and so I neither had any business in the ship, or learned to do any.
  • (botany) form of growth or general appearance of a variety or species of plant, e.g. erect, prostrate, bushy.
  • An addiction.
  • Synonyms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) habiten, from (etyl) habiter, from (etyl) ; see have.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To clothe.
  • (archaic) To inhabit.
  • strategy

    Noun

  • The science and art of military command as applied to the overall planning and conduct of warfare.
  • A plan of action intended to accomplish a specific goal.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , title=Lord Stranleigh Abroad , chapter=4 citation , passage=“I came down like a wolf on the fold, didn’t I??? Why didn’t I telephone??? Strategy', my dear boy, ' strategy . This is a surprise attack, and I’d no wish that the garrison, forewarned, should escape. …”}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= William E. Conner
  • , title= An Acoustic Arms Race , volume=101, issue=3, page=206-7, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close
  • The art of using similar techniques in politics or business.
  • Usage notes

    * Verbs often used with "strategy": drive, follow, pursue, execute, implement, adopt, abandon, accept, reject.

    Derived terms

    * exit strategy * strategic * strategics * strategist

    Coordinate terms

    * (an art of using similar techniques in politics or business) tactics

    See also

    * long game