Nomad vs Stranger - What's the difference?

nomad | stranger |


As adjectives the difference between nomad and stranger

is that nomad is nomadic while stranger is (strange).

As nouns the difference between nomad and stranger

is that nomad is nomad while stranger is a person whom one does not know; a person who is neither a friend nor an acquaintance.

As a verb stranger is

(obsolete|transitive) to estrange; to alienate.

nomad

English

Noun

(wikipedia nomad) (en noun)
  • A member of a group of people who, having no fixed home, move around seasonally in search of food, water and grazing etc.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , title= Geothermal Energy , volume=101, issue=4, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Energy has seldom been found where we need it when we want it. Ancient nomads , wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.}}
  • A wanderer.
  • Derived terms

    * grey nomad * nomade * nomadic * nomadism

    Anagrams

    * * ---- ==Serbo-Croatian==

    Noun

  • Declension

    {{sh-decl-noun , nòm?d, nomadi , nomáda, nomada , nomadu, nomadima , nomada, nomade , nomade, nomadi , nomadu, nomadima , nomadom, nomadima }}

    stranger

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (strange)
  • * Truth is stranger than fiction. (English proverb)
  • Derived terms

    * See strange

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person whom one does not know; a person who is neither a friend nor an acquaintance.
  • :
  • *
  • *:In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.Strangers might enter the room, but they were made to feel that they were there on sufferance: they were received with distance and suspicion.
  • An outsider or foreigner.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I am a most poor woman and a stranger , / Born out of your dominions.
  • * (1666-1735)
  • *:Melons on beds of ice are taught to bear, / And strangers to the sun yet ripen here.
  • *1961', : “”
  • A newcomer.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=[…] St.?Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger' s mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.}}
  • (lb) One who has not been seen for a long time.
  • :
  • (lb) One not belonging to the family or household; a guest; a visitor.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:To honour and receive / Our heavenly stranger .
  • (lb) One not privy or party an act, contract, or title; a mere intruder or intermeddler; one who interferes without right.
  • :
  • Synonyms

    * (person whom one does not know) * alien, foreigner, foreign national, non-national/nonnational, non-resident/nonresident, outsider * (newcomer) newbie, newcomer

    Antonyms

    * (person whom one does not know) acquaintance, friend * compatriot, countryman, fellow citizen, fellow countryman, national, resident * (newcomer)

    Derived terms

    * be no stranger to * don't be a stranger * stranger danger

    See also

    * myall

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To estrange; to alienate.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Anagrams

    * granters