Freak vs Stranger - What's the difference?

freak | stranger |


As nouns the difference between freak and stranger

is that freak is a man, particularly a bold, strong, vigorous man or freak can be a sudden causeless change or turn of the mind; a whim of fancy; a capricious prank; a vagary or caprice while stranger is a person whom one does not know; a person who is neither a friend nor an acquaintance.

As verbs the difference between freak and stranger

is that freak is to make greatly distressed and/or a discomposed appearance while stranger is (obsolete|transitive) to estrange; to alienate.

As adjectives the difference between freak and stranger

is that freak is strange, weird while stranger is (strange).

freak

English

Alternative forms

* (l) (obsolete) * (l), (l), (l) (Scotland)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) freke, .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A man, particularly a bold, strong, vigorous man.
  • A fellow; a petulant, young man.
  • Etymology 2

    1560, "sudden change of mind, whim", of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sudden causeless change or turn of the mind; a whim of fancy; a capricious prank; a vagary or caprice.
  • Someone or something that is markedly unusual.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • A hippie.
  • * {{quote-journal
  • , year = 1969 (but cites 1971 source) , first = Paul A. , last = Eschholz , title = Freak compounds for 'argot freaks' , journal = American Speech , volume = 44 , issue = 4 , url = , page = 306-07 , passage = When long-haired, outlandishly dressed, drug-using hippies pilgrimaged to Haight-Ashbury in the early 1960s, they were quickly dubbed freaks'''''; the pejorative appellation was both obvious and intended. It was not long before '''''freak''''' had become practically synonymous with ''hippie''. It seems, however, that with the acceptance of long hair, the appearance and popularity of some rather bizarre fashions, and the emphasis placed upon "doing one's own thing," '''''freak is no longer burdened with all of its former derogatory associations. Instead ... the word is beginning to acquire a quality which is favorable, glamorous, and somehow even admirable. }}
  • A drug addict.
  • * {{quote-journal
  • , year = 1969 (but cites 1971 source) , first = Paul A. , last = Eschholz , title = Freak compounds for "argot freaks" , journal = American Speech , volume = 44 , issue = 4 , url = , page = 306-07 , passage = Smith and Sturges [June 1969] note in their study of the San Francisco drug scene that freak means "anyone addicted to drugs." }}
  • (of a person) A nonconformist, especially in appearance, social behavior, sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or business practices; an oddball, especially in physiology (i.e., "circus freak"); unique, sometimes in a displeasing way.
  • (bodybuilding) A person whose physique has grown far beyond the normal limits of muscular development; often a bodybuilder weighing more than 120 kilos (260 pounds).
  • An enthusiast, or person who has an obsession with, or extreme knowledge of, something.
  • * {{quote-journal
  • , year = 1968 , first = Fred , last = Davis , coauthors = Laura Munoz , title = Heads and freaks: patterns and meanings of drug use among hippies , journal = Journal of Health and Social Behavior , volume = 9 , issue = 2 , url = , page = 156-64 , passage = Anyone ... who seems "hung up" on some idea, activity or interactional disposition, might be called a "freak ." }}
  • * {{quote-journal
  • , year = 1969 (but cites 1971 source) , first = Paul A. , last = Eschholz , title = Freak compounds for "argot freaks" , journal = American Speech , volume = 44 , issue = 4 , url = , page = 306-07 , passage = Presently ... college students ... use freak to denote any kind of enthusiast. }}
    Bob's a real video-game freak . He owns every games console of the last ten years.
  • (informal, sometimes, affectionate) A very sexually perverse individual.
  • She's a freak in the sack!
    Synonyms
    * (sudden change) whim * (sudden change) caprice
    Derived terms
    * fly the freak flag * freak accident * freak flag * freak of nature * freakishly * freaky

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make greatly distressed and/or a discomposed appearance
  • * 1994 , James Earl Hardy, B-Boy Blues: A Seriously Sexy, Fiercely Funny, Black-On-Black Love Story , (Alyson Publishing), page 107
  • But after one night turned into five days, I was freaking out. I missed him.
  • To be placed or place someone under the influence of a psychedelic drug
  • * 1992 , Peter G. Stafford, Psychedelics Encyclopedia , (Ronin Publishing), page 56
  • To streak; to variegate
  • * 1930 , Robert Seymour Bridges, The Testament of Beauty: A Poem in Four Books , (Literary Criticism), page 20
  • * Thomson
  • Freaked with many a mingled hue.
  • To experience reality withdrawal, or hallucinations (nightmarish), to behave irrational or unconventional due to drug use.
  • To react extremely or irrationally, usually under distress or discomposure
  • * Bulgarian: (trans-mid) (trans-bottom)
    Derived terms
    * freak out

    Adjective

    (-)
  • strange, weird
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=April 15 , author=Saj Chowdhury , title=Norwich 2 - 1 Nott'm Forest , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=A freak goal gave Forest the lead when a clearance by keeper John Ruddy bounced off Nathan Tyson and flew in.}} * Bulgarian: (trans-mid) (trans-bottom)

    Anagrams

    *

    stranger

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (strange)
  • * Truth is stranger than fiction. (English proverb)
  • Derived terms

    * See strange

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person whom one does not know; a person who is neither a friend nor an acquaintance.
  • :
  • *
  • *:In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.Strangers might enter the room, but they were made to feel that they were there on sufferance: they were received with distance and suspicion.
  • An outsider or foreigner.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I am a most poor woman and a stranger , / Born out of your dominions.
  • * (1666-1735)
  • *:Melons on beds of ice are taught to bear, / And strangers to the sun yet ripen here.
  • *1961', : “”
  • A newcomer.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=[…] St.?Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger' s mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.}}
  • (lb) One who has not been seen for a long time.
  • :
  • (lb) One not belonging to the family or household; a guest; a visitor.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:To honour and receive / Our heavenly stranger .
  • (lb) One not privy or party an act, contract, or title; a mere intruder or intermeddler; one who interferes without right.
  • :
  • Synonyms

    * (person whom one does not know) * alien, foreigner, foreign national, non-national/nonnational, non-resident/nonresident, outsider * (newcomer) newbie, newcomer

    Antonyms

    * (person whom one does not know) acquaintance, friend * compatriot, countryman, fellow citizen, fellow countryman, national, resident * (newcomer)

    Derived terms

    * be no stranger to * don't be a stranger * stranger danger

    See also

    * myall

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To estrange; to alienate.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Anagrams

    * granters