Swathe vs Strait - What's the difference?

swathe | strait |


As nouns the difference between swathe and strait

is that swathe is a bandage; a band; while strait is (geography) a narrow channel of water connecting two larger bodies of water.

As verbs the difference between swathe and strait

is that swathe is to bind with a swathe, band, bandage, or rollers while strait is (obsolete) to put to difficulties.

As an adjective strait is

(archaic) narrow; restricted as to space or room; close.

As an adverb strait is

(obsolete) strictly; rigorously.

swathe

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bandage; a band;
  • (chiefly, British, usually in plural) A group of people.
  • Large swathes will be affected by the tax increase.
  • * 2012 , The Economist, Sep 29th 2012 issue, Venezuela’s presidential election: The autocrat and the ballot box
  • As well as the advantages of abused office, Mr Chávez can boast enduring popularity among a broad swathe of poorer Venezuelans. They like him for his charisma, humble background and demotic speech.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 23 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Man Utd 1 - 6 Man City , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=United's stature is such that one result must not bring the immediate announcement of a shift in the balance of power in Manchester - but the swathes of empty seats around Old Trafford and the wave of attacks pouring towards David de Gea's goal in the second half emphasised that City quite simply have greater firepower and talent in their squad at present.}}

    Verb

    (swath)
  • To bind with a swathe, band, bandage, or rollers.
  • * Archbishop Abbot
  • Their children are never swathed or bound about with anything when they are first born.
  • * 1898 , , (Moonfleet) Chapter 4
  • The head was swathed in linen bands that had been white, but were now stained and discoloured with damp, but of this I shall not speak more, and beneath the chin-cloth the beard had once escaped.

    Anagrams

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    strait

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (archaic) Narrow; restricted as to space or room; close.
  • * Emerson
  • too strait and low our cottage doors
  • * 1866 , , Aholibah , lines 53-55
  • Sweet oil was poured out on thy head
    And ran down like cool rain between
    The strait close locks it melted in.
  • * 1900 , , To One in Bedlam , lines 3-5
  • Those scentless wisps of straw, that miserably line
    His strait , caged universe, whereat the dull world stares,
    Pedant and pitiful.
  • (archaic) Righteous, strict.
  • to follow the strait and narrow
  • * 1597 , , IV. iii. 79:
  • some certain edicts and some strait decrees
  • * Bible, Acts xxvi. 5 (Rev. Ver.)
  • the straitest sect of our religion
  • (obsolete) Tight; close; tight-fitting.
  • * 1613 , , III. vi. 86:
  • Is not this piece too strait ? / No, no, 'tis well.
  • (obsolete) Close; intimate; near; familiar.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • a strait degree of favour
  • (obsolete) Difficult; distressful; straited.
  • * Secker
  • to make your strait' circumstances yet ' straiter
  • (obsolete) Parsimonious; niggardly; mean.
  • * 1596 , , V. vii. 42:
  • I beg cold comfort, and you are so strait , / And so ingrateful, you deny me that.

    Usage notes

    The adjective is often confused with straight.

    Derived terms

    * straitjacket * strait-laced

    Noun

    (en noun) (wikipedia strait)
  • (geography) A narrow channel of water connecting two larger bodies of water.
  • The Strait of Gibraltar
  • * De Foe
  • We steered directly through a large outlet which they call a strait , though it be fifteen miles broad.
  • A narrow pass or passage.
  • * Spenser
  • He brought him through a darksome narrow strait / To a broad gate all built of beaten gold.
  • * 1602 , , III. iii. 154:
  • For honour travels in a strait so narrow / Where one but goes abreast.
  • A neck of land; an isthmus.
  • * Tennyson
  • a dark strait of barren land
  • A difficult position (often used in plural).
  • to be in dire straits
  • * South
  • Let no man, who owns a Providence, grow desperate under any calamity or strait whatsoever.
  • * Broome
  • Ulysses made use of the pretense of natural infirmity to conceal the straits he was in at that time in his thoughts.

    Derived terms

    * dire straits

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To put to difficulties.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (obsolete) Strictly; rigorously.
  • * 1593 , , III. ii. 20:
  • Proceed no straiter 'gainst our uncle Gloucester

    Anagrams

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