Blaze vs Storm - What's the difference?

blaze | storm |


As a noun blaze

is a fire, especially a fast-burning fire producing a lot of flames and light.

As a verb blaze

is to be on fire, especially producing a lot of flames and light.

As a proper noun storm is

.

blaze

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) blase, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A fire, especially a fast-burning fire producing a lot of flames and light.
  • *
  • *:Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze . When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth and heaping kindling on the coals,.
  • Intense, direct light accompanied with heat.
  • :
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon!
  • The white or lighter-coloured markings on a horse's face.
  • :
  • A high-visibility orange colour, typically used in warning signs and hunters' clothing.
  • A bursting out, or active display of any quality; an outburst.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:his blaze of wrath
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:For what is glory but the blaze of fame?
  • A spot made on trees by chipping off a piece of the bark, usually as a surveyor's mark.
  • *Robert Carlton (B. R. Hall, 1798-1863)
  • *:Three blazes' in a perpendicular line on the same tree indicating a legislative road, the single ' blaze a settlement or neighbourhood road.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) blasen, from (etyl) . See above.

    Verb

    (blaz)
  • To be on fire, especially producing a lot of flames and light.
  • To shine like a flame.
  • * (William Wordsworth)
  • And far and wide the icy summit blazed .
  • * , chapter=1
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path […]. It twisted and turned,
  • To make a thing shine like a flame.
  • To mark or cut (a route, especially through vegetation), or figuratively, to set a precedent for the taking-on of a challenge.
  • (slang) To smoke marijuana.
  • * Most commonly used in the infinitive, simple present, or simple past:
  • ::
  • * Or less commonly, in the present progressive:
  • ::
  • storm

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) storm, from (etyl) . Related to (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any disturbed state of the atmosphere, especially as affecting the earth's surface, and strongly implying destructive or unpleasant weather.
  • * Shakespeare
  • We hear this fearful tempest sing, / Yet seek no shelter to avoid the storm .
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-01
  • , author=Donald Worster , title=A Drier and Hotter Future , volume=100, issue=1, page=70 , magazine= citation , passage=Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.}}
  • A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; violent outbreak.
  • The proposed reforms have led to a political storm .
  • * Shakespeare
  • Her sister / Began to scold and raise up such a storm .
  • (meteorology) a wind scale for very strong wind, stronger than a gale, less than a hurricane (10 or higher on the Beaufort scale).
  • (military) A violent assault on a stronghold or fortified position.
  • Hyponyms
    * See also
    Coordinate terms
    * (meteorology) breeze, gale, hurricane
    Derived terms
    * barnstorm * bestorm * duststorm * leafstorm * sandstorm * snowstorm * storm in a tea-kettle * stormlike * stormtrooper * stormy * thunderstorm * windstorm
    See also
    * blizzard

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) stormen, sturmen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To move quickly and noisily like a storm, usually in a state of uproar or anger.
  • She stormed out of the room.
  • To assault (a stronghold or fortification) with military forces.
  • Troops stormed the complex.