Spoked vs Stoked - What's the difference?

spoked | stoked |


As adjectives the difference between spoked and stoked

is that spoked is having spokes while stoked is (slang) feeling excitement or an exciting rush.

As a verb stoked is

(stoke).

spoked

English

Adjective

(-)
  • having spokes
  • *{{quote-book, year=1909, author=Olive M. Briggs, title=The Black Cross, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=The river winds underneath it, and the great spoked wheel turns slowly, tossing the water into a cloud of yellow foam, flinging the spray afar into the dark, flowing stream, catching it again; playing with it, half sportive, half fierce, like some monster alive. }}
  • * 1986 , Mary Dove, The perfect age of man's life (page 84)
  • On the north wall of the former chapel of St Anthony in Leominster Priory church in Herefordshire, a ten-spoked wheel, with ten medallions on the circumference and one central medallion, is all that can now be seen
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=June 1, author=R.M. Johnson, title=On Exhibit: The Mountain Bike's Primitive Ancestors, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=It features equal-sized spoked hickory wheels, pneumatic tires, a chain drive, and an elliptical chain ring, something Japanese manufacturers reintroduced on bicycles in the late 1970s. }}

    stoked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (stoke)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (slang) Feeling excitement or an exciting rush.
  • * 1964 , '', 3 December 1964. Quoted in Sidney J. Baker, ''The Australian Language , second edition, 1966, chapter XI, end of section 2, page 255.
  • When you're driving hard and fast down the wall, with the soup curling behind yer, or doing this backside turn on a big one about to tube, it's just this feeling. Yer know, it leaves yer feeling stoked .