Gust vs Stir - What's the difference?

gust | stir | Related terms |

Gust is a related term of stir.


As nouns the difference between gust and stir

is that gust is pleasure while stir is scorpion.

gust

English

Etymology 1

Apparently from (etyl) gustr , though not recorded before Shakespeare.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
  • Any rush or outburst (of water, emotion etc.).
  • (Francis Bacon)
    Synonyms
    * windflaw

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To blow in gusts.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) gustus ‘taste’. For the verb, compare (etyl) (lena) gustare, (etyl) gustare, (etyl) gustar.

    Noun

    (-)
  • (archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
  • Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • An ox will relish the tender flesh of kids with as much gust and appetite.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Destroy all creatures for thy sport or gust.
  • * 1942': ‘Yes, indeed,’ said Sava with solemn '''gust . — Rebecca West, ''Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 1050)
  • Intellectual taste; fancy.
  • * Dryden
  • A choice of it may be made according to the gust and manner of the ancients.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To taste.
  • (obsolete) To have a relish for.
  • Anagrams

    * * ----

    stir

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) stiren, from (etyl) styrian, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (stirr)
  • To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  • *(rfdate), (Sir William Temple)
  • *:My foot I had never yet in five days been able to stir .
  • (lb) To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate.
  • :
  • *(rfdate), (William Shakespeare)
  • *:My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirred .
  • (lb) To agitate the content of (a container) by passing something through it.
  • :
  • (lb) To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  • *(rfdate), (Francis Bacon)
  • *:Stir not questions of jurisdiction.
  • (lb) To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt; to excite.
  • *(rfdate) (Chaucer)
  • *:To stir men to devotion.
  • *(rfdate), (William Shakespeare)
  • *:An Ate, stirring him to blood and strife.
  • *(rfdate), (John Dryden)
  • *:And for her sake some mutiny will stir .
  • *1922 , (Margery Williams), (The Velveteen Rabbit)
  • *:That night he was almost too happy to sleep, and so much love stirred in his little sawdust heart that it almost burst.
  • (lb) To move; to change one’s position.
  • *(rfdate) (Byron)
  • *:I had not power to stir or strive, But felt that I was still alive.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy oneself.
  • *(rfdate) (Byron)
  • *:All are not fit with them to stir and toil.
  • *(rfdate) (Charles Merivale)
  • *:The friends of the unfortunate exile, far from resenting his unjust suspicions, were stirring anxiously in his behalf.
  • (lb) To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  • *(rfdate), (Isaac Watts)
  • *:They fancy they have a right to talk freely upon everything that stirs or appears.
  • To rise, or be up and about, in the morning.
  • *
  • *:"Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins," remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir ; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: "Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir! "
  • Usage notes
    * In all transitive senses except the first, (term) is often followed by (up) with an intensive effect; as, (term); (term).
    Synonyms
    * (to move) incite; awaken; rouse; animate; stimulate; excite; provoke.
    Derived terms
    * stir-fry * stirrer * stir up * straw that stirs the drink

    Noun

  • The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
  • * (rfdate), .
  • Why all these words, this clamor, and this stir ?
  • * (rfdate), .
  • ''Consider, after so much stir about genus and species, how few words we have yet settled definitions of.
  • Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
  • * (rfdate), .
  • Being advertised of some stirs raised by his unnatural sons in England.
  • Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.
  • Etymology 2

    (en)

    Noun

    (-)
  • (lb) Jail; prison.
  • :
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat.. He'd never been in stir , the bulls had never mugged him, he didn't run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn't swear he knew his face. Most lone wolves had a moll at any rate—women were their ruin—but if the Bat had a moll, not even the grapevine telegraph could locate her.
  • Anagrams

    * * English ergative verbs ----