Spine vs Sting - What's the difference?

spine | sting |


As nouns the difference between spine and sting

is that spine is proprietress (of a shop, café, or brothel) while sting is a bump left on the skin after having been stung.

As a verb sting is

to hurt, usually by introducing poison or a sharp point, or both.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

spine

English

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Noun

(en noun)
  • The series of bones situated at the back from the head to the pelvis of a person, or from the head to the tail of an animal; backbone, vertebral column.
  • * 1851 , (Herman Melville), (Moby-Dick) , :
  • If you attentively regard almost any quadruped's spine , you will be struck with the resemblance of its vertebrae to a strung necklace of dwarfed skulls.
  • * , chapter=16
  • , title=The Mirror and the Lamp citation
  • Something resembling a backbone, such as a ridge, or a long, central structure from which other structures radiate.
  • * '>citation
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  • # The narrow, bound edge of a book.
  • #* '>citation
  • A rigid, pointed surface protuberance or needle-like structure on an animal, shell, or plant.
  • * 1871 , (Charles Darwin), (w) , :
  • The male, as Dr. Gunther informs me, has a cluster of stiff, straight spines , like those of a comb, on the sides of the tail.
  • (figurative) Courage or assertiveness.
  • *
  • Derived terms

    * send shivers down someone's spine * spina bifida * spinal * spinal canal * spinal column * spinal cord * spine board * spineless * spiniferous * spinose * spinous * spiny

    Anagrams

    *

    sting

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bump left on the skin after having been stung.
  • A bite by an insect.
  • A pointed portion of an insect or arachnid used for attack.
  • A sharp, localised pain primarily on the epidermis
  • (botany) A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secretes an acrid fluid, as in nettles.
  • The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the lurking serpent's mortal sting
  • (law enforcement) A police operation in which the police pretend to be criminals in order to catch a criminal.
  • A short percussive phrase played by a drummer to accent the punchline in a comedy show.
  • A brief sequence of music used in films, TV as a form of punctuation in a dramatic or comedic scene. In certain videogames stings are used to predict immediate future actions or to illustrate a current tension or mood.
  • A support for a wind tunnel model which extends parallel to the air flow.
  • *
  • (figurative) The harmful or painful part of something.
  • * Bible, 1 Corinthians xv. 56
  • The sting of death is sin.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 19 , author=Jonathan Stevenson , title=Leeds 1 - 3 Arsenal , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Just as it appeared Arsenal had taken the sting out of the tie, Johnson produced a moment of outrageous quality, thundering a bullet of a left foot shot out of the blue and into the top left-hand corner of Wojciech Szczesny's net with the Pole grasping at thin air. }}
  • A goad; incitement.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • The point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying.
  • Synonyms
    * (pointed portion of an insect) stinger

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) stingen, from (etyl) . Compare Swedish and Icelandic stinga.

    Verb

  • To hurt, usually by introducing poison or a sharp point, or both.
  • Right so came out an adder of a little heathbush, and it stung a knight in the foot.
    Still, it stung when a slightly older acquaintance asked me why I couldn't do any better.
  • (of an insect) To bite.
  • (sometimes figurative) To hurt, to be in pain.
  • My hand stings after knocking on the door so long.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 11 , author=Jonathan Stevenson , title=West Ham 2 - 1 Birmingham , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=But Birmingham were clearly stung by some harsh words from manager Alex McLeish at the break and within 15 minutes of the restart the game had an entirely different complexion.}}
  • (figurative) To cause harm or pain to.
  • I thought I could park in front of the hotel, but they stung me for five pounds!
    Derived terms
    * sting like a bee * stingy

    Anagrams

    * English irregular verbs ----