Verse vs Stichic - What's the difference?

verse | stichic |


As a noun verse

is dew, dampness.

As an adjective stichic is

describing verse that is not divided into stanzas, but consists of lines all having the same metrical form.

verse

English

Etymology 1

Partly from (etyl) vers; partly, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A poetic form with regular meter and a fixed rhyme scheme.
  • Poetic form in general.
  • One of several similar units of a song, consisting of several lines, generally rhymed.
  • A small section of the Jewish or Christian Bible.
  • Derived terms
    * blank verse * free verse

    Verb

    (vers)
  • (obsolete) To compose verses.
  • * Sir (Philip Sidney) (1554-1586)
  • It is not rhyming and versing that maketh a poet.
  • To tell in verse, or poetry.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • playing on pipes of corn and versing love

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (vers)
  • to educate about, to teach about.
  • * , chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part.

    Etymology 3

    Back-formation from versus, misconstrued as a third-person singular verb *verses .

    Verb

    (vers)
  • (colloquial) To oppose, to be an opponent for, as in a game, contest or battle.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    stichic

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Describing verse that is not divided into stanzas, but consists of lines all having the same metrical form