Stage vs Stave - What's the difference?

stage | stave |


As nouns the difference between stage and stave

is that stage is a phase while stave is one of a number of narrow strips of wood, or narrow iron plates, placed edge to edge to form the sides, covering, or lining of a vessel or structure; especially, one of the strips which form the sides of a cask, a pail, etc.

As verbs the difference between stage and stave

is that stage is to produce on a stage, to perform a play while stave is to break in the staves of; to break a hole in; to burst often with in .

stage

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A phase.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.}}
  • The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage .
  • * (1791–1875)
  • Lo! Where the stage , the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
  • A floor or storey of a house.
  • (Wyclif)
  • A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  • A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  • A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
  • * (William Cowper) (1731-1800)
  • a parcel sent you by the stage
  • * (Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • I went in the sixpenny stage .
  • (label) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  • (label) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
  • * Jeffrey
  • A stage signifies a certain distance on a road.
  • * 1858 , (Samuel Smiles), (Robert Stephenson), The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer , p.356
  • He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages .
  • *{{quote-book, year=1910, author=(Emerson Hough)
  • , title= The Purchase Price, chapter=3 , passage=The Mount Vernon , favoured by a good stage of water, soon cleared the narrow Monongahela channel, passed the confluence, and headed down under full steam, […].}}
  • (label) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  • The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
  • (label) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
  • A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Music and ethereal mirth / Wherewith the stage of air and earth did ring.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.}}

    Synonyms

    * (phase) tier, level

    Derived terms

    * sage on the stage * stagecoach * stage-door Johnny * stage whisper * staging area

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
  • The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  • To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
  • The salesman’s demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  • (Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
  • To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.
  • We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    stave

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of a number of narrow strips of wood, or narrow iron plates, placed edge to edge to form the sides, covering, or lining of a vessel or structure; especially, one of the strips which form the sides of a cask, a pail, etc.
  • One of the bars or rounds of a rack, rungs of a ladder, etc; one of the cylindrical bars of a lantern wheel
  • (poetry) A metrical portion; a stanza; a staff.
  • * Wordsworth
  • Let us chant a passing stave / In honour of that hero brave.
  • (label) The five horizontal and parallel lines on and between which musical notes are written or pointed; the staff.
  • A staff or walking stick.
  • Verb

  • To break in the staves of; to break a hole in; to burst. Often with in .
  • to stave in a cask
  • * 1851 ,
  • Be careful in the hunt, ye mates. Don’t stave the boats needlessly, ye harpooneers; good white cedar plank is raised full three per cent within the year.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1914 , year_published=2009 , edition=HTML , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burrows , title=The Mucker , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=…for the jagged butt of the fallen mast was dashing against the ship's side with such vicious blows that it seemed but a matter of seconds ere it would stave a hole in her. }}
  • To push, as with a staff. With off .
  • * South
  • The condition of a servant staves him off to a distance.
  • To delay by force or craft; to drive away. Often with off .
  • to stave off the execution of a project
  • * Tennyson
  • And answered with such craft as women use, / Guilty or guilties, to stave off a chance / That breaks upon them perilously.
  • To burst in pieces by striking against something.
  • To walk or move rapidly.
  • To suffer, or cause, to be lost by breaking the cask.
  • * Sandys
  • All the wine in the city has been staved .
  • To furnish with staves or rundles.
  • (Knolles)
  • To render impervious or solid by driving with a calking iron.
  • to stave lead, or the joints of pipes into which lead has been run

    Derived terms

    * stave in * stave off

    Anagrams

    * English contranyms ---- ==Norwegian Bokmål==

    Verb

  • to spell (words )
  • Derived terms

    *

    References

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