Adjourn vs Standover - What's the difference?

adjourn | standover |


As a verb adjourn

is to postpone.

As a noun standover is

the height above ground of the top horizontal tube of the frame of a bicycle; should be less than the height above ground of the rider's groin.

As an adjective standover is

using intimidation or threat of force to coerce others into submission or compliance eg "standover tactics" or "standover man".

adjourn

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To postpone.
  • The trial was adjourned for a week.
  • To defer; to put off temporarily or indefinitely.
  • * Barrow
  • It is a common practice to adjourn the reformation of their lives to a further time.
  • To end or suspend an event.
  • The court will adjourn for lunch.
  • (intransitive, formal, uncommon) To move from one place to another.
  • After the dinner, we will adjourn to the bar.

    See also

    * adjournment

    standover

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • the height above ground of the top horizontal tube of the frame of a bicycle; should be less than the height above ground of the rider's groin
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • using intimidation or threat of force to coerce others into submission or compliance. e.g. "standover tactics" or "standover man".