Standard vs Uniform - What's the difference?

standard | uniform |


As nouns the difference between standard and uniform

is that standard is a level of quality or attainment while uniform is a distinctive outfit that serves to identify members of a group.

As adjectives the difference between standard and uniform

is that standard is falling within an accepted range of size, amount, power, quality, etc while uniform is unvarying; all the same.

As a verb uniform is

to clothe in a uniform.

standard

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A principle or example or measure used for comparison.
  • # A level of quality or attainment.
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again;
  • # Something used as a measure for comparative evaluations; a model.
  • #* (Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • the court, which used to be the standard of property and correctness of speech
  • #* (Edmund Burke) (1729-1797)
  • A disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve, taken together, would be my standard of a statesman.
  • # A musical work of established popularity.
  • # A rule or set of rules or requirements which are widely agreed upon or imposed by government.
  • # The proportion of weights of fine metal and alloy established for coinage.
  • #* (John Arbuthnot) (1667-1735)
  • By the present standard of the coinage, sixty-two shillings is coined out of one pound weight of silver.
  • # A bottle of wine containing 0.750 liters of fluid.
  • A vertical pole with something at its apex.
  • # An object supported in an upright position, such as a .
  • #* {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , chapter=Foreword, title= The China Governess , passage=‘It was called the wickedest street in London and the entrance was just here. I imagine the mouth of the road lay between this lamp standard and the second from the next down there.’}}
  • # The flag or ensign carried by a military unit.
  • #* Fairfax
  • His armies, in the following day, / On those fair plains their standards proud display.
  • # One of the upright members that supports the horizontal axis of a transit or theodolite.
  • # Any upright support, such as one of the poles of a scaffold.
  • # A tree of natural size supported by its own stem, and not dwarfed by grafting on the stock of a smaller species nor trained upon a wall or trellis.
  • #* Sir W. Temple
  • In France part of their gardens is laid out for flowers, others for fruits; some standards , some against walls.
  • # The sheth of a plough.
  • A manual transmission vehicle.
  • (botany) The upper petal or banner of a papilionaceous corolla.
  • (shipbuilding) An inverted knee timber placed upon the deck instead of beneath it, with its vertical branch turned upward from that which lies horizontally.
  • A large drinking cup.
  • (Greene)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Falling within an accepted range of size, amount, power, quality, etc.
  • (of a tree or shrub) Growing on an erect stem of full height.
  • Having recognized excellence or authority.
  • standard''' works in history; '''standard authors
  • Of a usable or serviceable grade or quality.
  • (not comparable, of a motor vehicle) Having a manual transmission.
  • As normally supplied (not optional).
  • Antonyms

    * nonstandard

    Derived terms

    * bog standard * gold standard * double standard * standard-bearer * standard fare * standard gauge * standard lamp * standard language * Standard Model * standard of living * standard poodle * standard time * standard transmission * standard deviation * time standard

    uniform

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Unvarying; all the same.
  • Consistent; conforming to one standard.
  • * Hooker
  • The only doubt is how far churches are bound to be uniform in their ceremonies.
  • (mathematics) with speed of convergence not depending on choice of function argument; as in uniform continuity, uniform convergence
  • Derived terms

    * uniformity * uniformly

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A distinctive outfit that serves to identify members of a group.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=6 citation , passage=‘[…] I remember a lady coming to inspect St. Mary's Home where I was brought up and seeing us all in our lovely Elizabethan uniforms we were so proud of, and bursting into tears all over us because “it was wicked to dress us like charity children”. […]’.}}
  • * F. W. Robertson
  • There are many things which a soldier will do in his plain clothes which he scorns to do in his uniform .
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author=(Peter Wilby)
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=30, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Finland spreads word on schools , passage=Imagine a country where children do nothing but play until they start compulsory schooling at age seven. Then, without exception, they attend comprehensives until the age of 16.
  • Phonetic equivalent for the letter U in the ICAO spelling alphabet, informally known as the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • A uniformed police officer (as opposed to a detective).
  • * 1996 , S. J. Rozan, Concourse , Macmillan, ISBN 0-312-95944-3, page 265,
  • Skeletor held the gun against Speedo’s head, held Speedo between himself and the cops who stood, motionless and futile, where they’d stopped. Robinson, Lindfors, Carter, three uniforms and I watched helpless as Skeletor, dragging Speedy with him, inched out the gate, started backing down the hill.
  • * 2001 , Christine Wiltz, The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld , Da Capo Press, ISBN 0-306-81012-3, page 113,
  • Four men flew out of it, three uniforms and one in what appeared to be an English riding outfit—boots, whip, the whole nine yards. He called out, “I’m the superintendent of police.”
  • * 2004 , , Penny Dreadful , MacAdam/Cage Publishing, ISBN 1-931561-81-8, page 81,
  • Eyes to the front now and there was the body, a lump of black and brown. Moon counted three uniforms and a photographer, the medical examiner and his assistant.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To clothe in a uniform.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1910, author=Robert W. Chambers, title=Ailsa Paige, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=You can't erect an army by uniforming and drilling a few hundred thousand clerks and farmers. }} ----