Require vs Squeeze - What's the difference?

require | squeeze | Related terms |

Require is a related term of squeeze.


As verbs the difference between require and squeeze

is that require is (label) to ask (someone) for something; to request while squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

As a noun squeeze is

a difficult position.

require

English

Verb

(requir)
  • (label) To ask (someone) for something; to request.
  • *, Bk.XI:
  • *:I requyre yow lete vs be sworne to gyders that neuer none of vs shalle after this day haue adoo with other, and there with alle syre Tristram and sire Lamorak sware that neuer none of hem shold fyghte ageynst other nor for wele, nor for woo.
  • *1526 , Bible , tr. William Tyndale, Mark V:
  • *:I requyre the in the name of god, that thou torment me nott.
  • To demand, to insist upon (having); to call for authoritatively.
  • *1998 , Joan Wolf, The Gamble , Warner Books:
  • *:"I am Miss Newbury," I announced, "and I require to be shown to my room immediately, if you please."
  • *2009 , Vikram Dodd, The Guardian , 29 December:
  • *:‘Regrettably, I have concluded, after considering the matter over Christmas, that I can no longer maintain the high standard of service I require of myself, meet the demands of office and cope with the pressures of public life, without my health deteriorating further.’
  • Naturally to demand (something) as indispensable; to need, to call for as necessary.
  • *1972 , "Aid for Aching Heads", Time , 5 June:
  • *:Chronic pain is occasionally a sign of a very serious problem, like brain tumors, and can require surgery.
  • *2009 , Julian Borger, The Guardian , 7 February:
  • *:A weapon small enough to put on a missile would require uranium enriched to more than 90% U-235.
  • To demand of (someone) to do something.
  • *1970 , "Compulsory Midi", Time , 29 June:
  • *:After Aug 3 all salesgirls will be required to wear only one style of skirt while on duty: the midi.
  • *2007 , Allegra Stratton, "Smith to ban non-EU unskilled immigrants from working in UK", The Guardian , 5 December:
  • *:The government would like to require non-British fiances who wish to marry a British citizen to sit an English test.
  • squeeze

    English

    Verb

    (squeez)
  • To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once
  • I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • "Over there—by the rock," Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders's back.
  • (ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place
  • I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=It was an omen of things to come as in the 56th minute the visitors took the lead after a mix-up between Skrtel and Sotirios Kyrgiakos allowed Ebanks-Blake's through-ball to squeeze between them.}}
  • * 1908 ,
  • Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  • To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty
  • He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  • To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices
  • I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
  • * 2013 May 23, , " British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party," New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
  • At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  • (figurative) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  • * L'Estrange
  • In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.
  • (baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting
  • Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from the verb "squeeze") * squeezable * squeezebox * squeeze in * squeeze out * squeezer * squeezy * unsqueeze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A difficult position
  • I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.
  • A traversal of a narrow passage
  • It was a tight squeeze , but I got through to the next section of the cave.
  • A hug or other affectionate grasp
  • a gentle squeeze on the arm
  • (slang) A romantic partner
  • I want to be your main squeeze
  • (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third
  • The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze .
  • (epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
  • The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.
  • (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  • (archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
  • See also

    * squash * squeegee * squish * margin squeeze