Push vs Squeeze - What's the difference?

push | squeeze |


In lang=en terms the difference between push and squeeze

is that push is to continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action while squeeze is to put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices.

As verbs the difference between push and squeeze

is that push is (intransitive) to apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force while squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

As nouns the difference between push and squeeze

is that push is a short, directed application of force; an act of pushing or push can be (obsolete|uk|dialect) a pustule; a pimple while squeeze is a difficult position.

push

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) ).

Verb

(es)
  • (intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.
  • In his anger he pushed me against the wall and threatened me.
    You need to push quite hard to get this door open.
  • To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • We are pushed for an answer.
  • * Spectator
  • Ambition pushes the soul to such actions as are apt to procure honour to the actor.
  • To press or urge forward; to drive.
  • to push''' an objection too far; to '''push one's luck
  • * Dryden
  • to push his fortune
  • To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).
  • Stop pushing the issue — I'm not interested.
    They're pushing that perfume again.
    There were two men hanging around the school gates today, pushing drugs.
  • (informal) To approach; to come close to.
  • My old car is pushing 250,000 miles.
    He's pushing sixty.'' (= ''he's nearly sixty years old )
  • To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • During childbirth, there are times when the obstetrician advises the woman not to push .
  • To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.
  • To make a higher bid at an auction.
  • (poker) To make an all-in bet.
  • (chess) To move (a pawn) directly forward.
  • (computing) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.
  • * 1992 , Michael A. Miller, The 68000 Microprocessor Family: Architecture, Programming, and Applications (page 47)
  • When the microprocessor decodes the JSR opcode, it stores the operand into the TEMP register and pushes the current contents of the PC ($00 0128) onto the stack.
  • (obsolete) To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.
  • * Bible, Exodus xxi. 32
  • If the ox shall push a manservant or maidservant, the ox shall be stoned.
  • To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.
  • Synonyms
    * to press, to shove, to thrutch * (continue to attempt to persuade) to press, to urge * (continue to promote) to press, to advertise, to promote * (come close to) to approach, to near * to press, to shove, to thring * (tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents) to bear down
    Antonyms
    * (apply a force to something so it moves away) to draw, to pull, to tug * (put onto a stack) to pop
    Derived terms
    * pedal pushers * push around * push-bike * pushful * push in * push off * push one's luck * pushover * push someone's buttons * push it * push-up * pushy

    Noun

    (es)
  • A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.
  • Give the door a hard push if it sticks.
  • An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • One more push and the baby will be out.
  • A great effort (to do something).
  • Some details got lost in the push to get the project done.
    Let's give one last push on our advertising campaign.
  • (military) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.
  • A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score
  • (computing) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.
  • (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in server push'', ''push technology .
  • (dated) A crowd or throng or people
  • * 1891 , Banjo Paterson,
  • Till some wild, excited person
    Galloped down the township cursing,
    "Sydney push have mobbed Macpherson,
    Roll up, Dandaloo!"
    Derived terms
    * give someone the push

    Etymology 2

    Probably (etyl) poche. See pouch.

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A pustule; a pimple.
  • (Francis Bacon)
    1000 English basic words ----

    squeeze

    English

    Verb

    (squeez)
  • To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once
  • I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • "Over there—by the rock," Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders's back.
  • (ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place
  • I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=It was an omen of things to come as in the 56th minute the visitors took the lead after a mix-up between Skrtel and Sotirios Kyrgiakos allowed Ebanks-Blake's through-ball to squeeze between them.}}
  • * 1908 ,
  • Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  • To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty
  • He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  • To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices
  • I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
  • * 2013 May 23, , " British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party," New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
  • At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  • (figurative) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  • * L'Estrange
  • In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.
  • (baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting
  • Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from the verb "squeeze") * squeezable * squeezebox * squeeze in * squeeze out * squeezer * squeezy * unsqueeze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A difficult position
  • I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.
  • A traversal of a narrow passage
  • It was a tight squeeze , but I got through to the next section of the cave.
  • A hug or other affectionate grasp
  • a gentle squeeze on the arm
  • (slang) A romantic partner
  • I want to be your main squeeze
  • (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third
  • The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze .
  • (epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
  • The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.
  • (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  • (archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
  • See also

    * squash * squeegee * squish * margin squeeze