Spiled vs Spired - What's the difference?

spiled | spired |


As a verb spiled

is (spile).

As an adjective spired is

having a spire.

spiled

English

Verb

(head)
  • (spile)
  • Anagrams

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    spile

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) or (etyl) , (etyl) spile.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A splinter.
  • A spigot or plug used to stop the hole in a barrel or cask.
  • *1898 , , (Moonfleet) Chapter 4
  • *:So I felt my way down the passage back to the vault, and recked not of the darkness, nor of Blackbeard and his crew, if only I could lay my lips to liquor. Thus I groped about the barrels till near the top of the stack my hand struck on the spile of a keg, and drawing it, I got my mouth to the hold.
  • (US) A spout inserted in a maple (or other tree) to draw off sap.
  • Verb

    (spil)
  • To plug (a hole) with a spile.
  • To draw off (a liquid) using a spile.
  • To provide (a barrel, tree etc.) with a spile.
  • Etymology 2

    Alteration of (pile), after Etymology 1, above.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A pile; a post or girder.
  • Verb

    (spil)
  • To support by means of spiles.
  • Etymology 3

    Alteration of (l).

    Verb

    (spil)
  • (US, dialect, ambitransitive) spoil.
  • Anagrams

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    spired

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • having a spire
  • *{{quote-book, year=1894, author=John Muir, title=The Mountains of California, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=Perhaps some one of the multitude excites special attention, some gigantic castle with turret and battlement, or some Gothic cathedral more abundantly spired than Milan's. }}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=Edwin Bjorkman, title=The Soul of a Child, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=This was true not only of the trip on the steamer, the arrival at Enkoeping with its little old-fashioned red houses, the meeting with Mr. Swanson, the drive of thirty miles or more inland, the arrival at the sexton's house not far from a white spired church, and the introduction to a seemingly endless number of new faces, but of the whole long summer. }}

    Anagrams

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