Speak vs Bark - What's the difference?

speak | bark |


As verbs the difference between speak and bark

is that speak is to communicate with one's voice, to say words out loud while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

As nouns the difference between speak and bark

is that speak is language, jargon, or terminology used uniquely in a particular environment or group or speak can be (dated) a low class bar, a speakeasy while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

speak

English

(wikipedia speak)

Verb

  • To communicate with one's voice, to say words out loud.
  • * , chapter=13
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them.}}
  • To have a conversation.
  • (by extension) To communicate or converse by some means other than orally, such as writing or facial expressions.
  • To deliver a message to a group; to deliver a speech.
  • To be able to communicate in a language.
  • To utter.
  • * 1611 , (Authorized King James Version) (Bible translation), 9:5:
  • And they will deceive every one his neighbour, and will not speak the truth: they have taught their tongue to speak lies, and weary themselves to commit iniquity.
  • To communicate (some fact or feeling); to bespeak, to indicate.
  • * 1851 , (Herman Melville), (Moby-Dick) :
  • There he sat, his very indifference speaking a nature in which there lurked no civilized hypocrisies and bland deceits.
  • (informal, transitive, sometimes, humorous) To understand (as though it were a language).
  • To produce a sound; to sound.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Make all our trumpets speak .
  • (archaic) To address; to accost; to speak to.
  • * Bible, Ecclus. xiii. 6
  • [He will] thee in hope; he will speak thee fair.
  • * Emerson
  • Each village senior paused to scan / And speak the lovely caravan.

    Synonyms

    * articulate, talk, verbalize

    Derived terms

    * public speaking * speakable * speaker * speakeasy * re-speak * unspeakable phrasal verbs * speak down * speak for * speak out * speak to * speak up idioms * actions speak louder than words * on speaking terms * so to speak * speak for oneself * speak highly of * speak ill of * speak in tongues * speak of the devil * speak one's mind * speak softly and carry a big stick * speak someone's language * speak volumes * speak with one voice * spoken for

    Noun

    (-)
  • language, jargon, or terminology used uniquely in a particular environment or group.
  • Corporate speak; IT speak

    Derived terms

    * artspeak * cyberspeak * doublespeak * lawyerspeak * leetspeak * medspeak * Newspeak * weather speak

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dated) a low class bar, a speakeasy.
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * spake * peaks 1000 English basic words English irregular verbs ----

    bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.