Spark vs Sparkled - What's the difference?

spark | sparkled |


As verbs the difference between spark and sparkled

is that spark is to trigger, kindle into activity (an argument, etc) or spark can be to woo, court while sparkled is (sparkle).

As a noun spark

is a small particle of glowing matter, either molten or on fire or spark can be a gallant, a foppish young man.

spark

English

(wikipedia spark)

Etymology 1

From Middle English sparke, sperke, from Old English spearca, from (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small particle of glowing matter, either molten or on fire.
  • A short or small burst of electrical discharge.
  • A small, shining body, or transient light; a sparkle.
  • (figuratively) A small amount of something, such as an idea, that has the potential to become something greater, just as a spark can start a fire.
  • * Shakespeare
  • if any spark of life be yet remaining
  • * John Locke
  • We have here and there a little clear light, some sparks of bright knowledge .
  • * 2013 , Phil McNulty, "[http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/23830980]", BBC Sport , 1 September 2013:
  • Everton's Marouane Fellaini looks one certain arrival but Moyes, who also saw United held to a draw by Chelsea at Old Trafford on Monday, needs even more of a spark in a midfield that looked laboured by this team's standards.
  • (in plural'' sparks ''but treated as a singular ) A ship's radio operator.
  • (UK, slang) An electrician.
  • Synonyms
    * gnast * beginnings, germ, glimmer
    Derived terms
    * sparkle * bright spark * spark arrester * spark coil * spark gap * spark knock * spark of life * spark plug * spark transmitter * sparks fly

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To trigger, kindle into activity (an argument, etc).
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 5 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=The introduction of substitute Andy Carroll sparked Liverpool into life and he pulled a goal back just after the hour - and thought he had equalised as Kenny Dalglish's side laid siege to Chelsea's goal in the closing stages.}}
  • To give off a spark or sparks.
  • Derived terms
    * spark off * sparkle

    Etymology 2

    probably Scandinavian, akin to (etyl) sparkr 'sprightly'

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gallant, a foppish young man.
  • * Prior
  • The finest sparks and cleanest beaux.
  • A beau, lover.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To woo, court.
  • Derived terms

    * sparkish * sparker

    References

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    sparkled

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (sparkle)

  • sparkle

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), equivalent to .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A little spark; a scintillation.
  • * Spenser
  • As sparkles from the anvil rise, / When heavy hammers on the wedge are swayed.
  • * Prescott
  • The shock was sufficiently strong to strike out some sparkles of his fiery temper.
  • Brilliance; luster.
  • the sparkle of a diamond.
    =

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), equivalent to .

    Alternative forms

    * (obsolete)

    Verb

    (sparkl)
  • To emit sparks; to throw off ignited or incandescent particles; to shine as if throwing off sparks; to emit flashes of light; to scintillate; to twinkle; as, the blazing wood sparkles; the stars sparkle.
  • * A mantelet upon his shoulder hanging Bretful of rubies red, as fire sparkling . — Chaucer.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.}}
  • To manifest itself by, or as if by, emitting sparks; to glisten; to flash.
  • * Milton
  • I see bright honour sparkle through your eyes.
  • To emit little bubbles, as certain kinds of liquors; to effervesce; as, sparkling wine.
  • To emit in the form or likeness of sparks.
  • * Did sparkle forth great light. — Spenser
  • (obsolete) To disperse.
  • * The Landgrave hath sparkled his army without any further enterprise. — State Papers.
  • (obsolete) To scatter on or over.
  • Synonyms
    * shine, glisten, scintillate, radiate, coruscate, glitter, twinkle =

    References

    * (Webster 1913)