Bubble vs Spark - What's the difference?

bubble | spark |


In lang=en terms the difference between bubble and spark

is that bubble is to produce bubbles, to rise up in bubbles (such in foods cooking) while spark is to give off a spark or sparks.

As nouns the difference between bubble and spark

is that bubble is a spherically contained volume of air or other gas, especially one made from soapy liquid while spark is a small particle of glowing matter, either molten or on fire or spark can be a gallant, a foppish young man.

As verbs the difference between bubble and spark

is that bubble is to produce bubbles, to rise up in bubbles (such in foods cooking) while spark is to trigger, kindle into activity (an argument, etc) or spark can be to woo, court.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

bubble

English

(wikipedia bubble)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A spherically contained volume of air or other gas, especially one made from soapy liquid.
  • A small spherical cavity in a solid material.
  • bubbles in window glass, or in a lens
  • Anything resembling a hollow sphere.
  • (economics) A period of intense speculation in a market, causing prices to rise quickly to irrational levels as the metaphorical bubble expands, and then fall even more quickly as the bubble bursts (eg the ).
  • (obsolete) Someone who has been ‘bubbled’ or fooled; a dupe.
  • * Prior
  • Granny's a cheat, and I'm a bubble .
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1979, p. 15:
  • For no woman, sure, will plead the passion of love for an excuse. This would be to own herself the mere tool and bubble of the man.
  • (figurative) The emotional and/or physical atmosphere in which the subject is immersed; circumstances, ambience.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012
  • , date=June 3 , author=Nathan Rabin , title=TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Mr. Plow” (season 4, episode 9; originally aired 11/19/1992) citation , page= , passage=He’s wrapped up snugly in a cozy bubble of self-regard, talking for his own sake more than anyone else’s.}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 23 , author=Alistair Magowan , title=Blackburn 2 - 0 West Brom , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Thomas, so often West Brom's most positive attacker down their left side and up against Salgado, twice almost burst the bubble of excitement around the ground but he had two efforts superbly saved by Robinson.}}
  • (Cockney rhyming slang) a Greek (also: bubble and squeak)
  • A small, hollow, floating bead or globe, formerly used for testing the strength of spirits.
  • The globule of air in the spirit tube of a level.
  • Anything lacking firmness or solidity; a cheat or fraud; an empty project.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Then a soldier / Seeking the bubble reputation / Even in the cannon's mouth.
  • (Cockney rhyming slang) A laugh. (also: bubble bath)
  • Are you having a bubble ?!

    Synonyms

    * (a laugh) giraffe, bubble bath

    Verb

    (bubbl)
  • To produce bubbles, to rise up in bubbles (such in foods cooking).
  • (archaic) To cheat, delude.
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 443:
  • No, no, friend, I shall never be bubbled out of my religion in hopes only of keeping my place under another government
  • * Addison
  • She has bubbled him out of his youth.
  • * Sterne
  • The great Locke, who was seldom outwitted by false sounds, was nevertheless bubbled here.
  • (intransitive, Scotland, and, Northern England) To cry, weep.
  • Derived terms

    * bubble over * bubble up

    spark

    English

    (wikipedia spark)

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English sparke, sperke, from Old English spearca, from (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small particle of glowing matter, either molten or on fire.
  • A short or small burst of electrical discharge.
  • A small, shining body, or transient light; a sparkle.
  • (figuratively) A small amount of something, such as an idea, that has the potential to become something greater, just as a spark can start a fire.
  • * Shakespeare
  • if any spark of life be yet remaining
  • * John Locke
  • We have here and there a little clear light, some sparks of bright knowledge .
  • * 2013 , Phil McNulty, "[http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/23830980]", BBC Sport , 1 September 2013:
  • Everton's Marouane Fellaini looks one certain arrival but Moyes, who also saw United held to a draw by Chelsea at Old Trafford on Monday, needs even more of a spark in a midfield that looked laboured by this team's standards.
  • (in plural'' sparks ''but treated as a singular ) A ship's radio operator.
  • (UK, slang) An electrician.
  • Synonyms
    * gnast * beginnings, germ, glimmer
    Derived terms
    * sparkle * bright spark * spark arrester * spark coil * spark gap * spark knock * spark of life * spark plug * spark transmitter * sparks fly

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To trigger, kindle into activity (an argument, etc).
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 5 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=The introduction of substitute Andy Carroll sparked Liverpool into life and he pulled a goal back just after the hour - and thought he had equalised as Kenny Dalglish's side laid siege to Chelsea's goal in the closing stages.}}
  • To give off a spark or sparks.
  • Derived terms
    * spark off * sparkle

    Etymology 2

    probably Scandinavian, akin to (etyl) sparkr 'sprightly'

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gallant, a foppish young man.
  • * Prior
  • The finest sparks and cleanest beaux.
  • A beau, lover.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To woo, court.
  • Derived terms

    * sparkish * sparker

    References

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    Anagrams

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