Sauce vs Souse - What's the difference?

sauce | souse |


As nouns the difference between sauce and souse

is that sauce is while souse is something kept or steeped in brine or souse can be the act of sousing, or swooping or souse can be (label) sou (the french coin).

As a verb souse is

to immerse in liquid; to steep or drench or souse can be to strike, beat.

sauce

English

Noun

  • A liquid (often thickened) condiment or accompaniment to food.
  • apple sauce'''; mint '''sauce
  • (UK, Australia) tomato sauce (similar to US tomato ketchup), as in:
  • [meat] pie and [tomato] sauce
  • Alcohol, booze.
  • *
  • Maybe you should lay off the sauce .
  • (bodybuilding) Anabolic steroids.
  • (art) A soft crayon for use in stump drawing or in shading with the stump.
  • (internet slang) used when requesting the source of an image.
  • (dated) Cheek; impertinence; backtalk; sass.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year = 1967 , first = Barbara , last = Sleigh , authorlink = Barbara Sleigh , title = (Jessamy) , edition = 1993 , location = Sevenoaks, Kent , publisher=Bloomsbury , isbn = 0 340 19547 9 , page = 28 , url = , passage = ‘I’ll have none of your sauce', young Jessamy. Just because you’ve been took up by the family you’ve no call to give yourself airs. You’re only the housekeeper’s niece, and cook-housekeeper at that, and don’t you forgrt it. You know full well I’m parlour maid, Matchett to the gentry, ''Miss'' Matchett to you – you little —!’ Jessamy broke in anxiously. ‘But I didn’t mean it for ' sauce , really I didn’t:’ }}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year = 1967 , first = Barbara , last = Sleigh , authorlink = Barbara Sleigh , title = (Jessamy) , edition = 1993 , location = Sevenoaks, Kent , publisher=Bloomsbury , isbn = 0 340 19547 9 , page = 39 , url = , passage = ‘Well, you know what Matchett’s like! Just about bring herself to talk to me because I’m housemaid, but if the gardener’s boy so much as looks at ’er it’s sauce ,’ said Sarah. }}
  • Vegetables.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1833 , author=(John Neal) , title=The Down-Easters, Volume 1 , passage=I wanted cabbage or potaters, or most any sort o' garden sarse … .}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1882 , author= , title=Peck's Sunshine , chapter=Unscrewing the Top of a Fruit Jar citation , passage=and all would be well only for a remark of a little boy who, when asked if he will have some more of the sauce , says he "don't want no strawberries pickled in kerosene."}}
  • (obsolete, UK, US, dialect) Any garden vegetables eaten with meat.
  • * Beverly
  • Roots, herbs, vine fruits, and salad flowers they dish up various ways, and find them very delicious sauce to their meats, both roasted and boiled, fresh and salt.
    (Forby)
    (Bartlett)

    Derived terms

    * apple sauce, applesauce, apple-sauce * barbecue sauce * * * brown sauce * fair suck of the sauce bottle * fish sauce * hoisin sauce * hollandaise sauce * hot sauce * hunger is a good sauce * hunger is the best sauce * laurier-sauce * marchand de vin sauce * Marie Rose sauce * mint sauce * mother sauce * oyster sauce * pasta sauce * ranchero sauce * saucepan * saucepot * saucy * soy sauce * special sauce * steak sauce * sweet-and-sour sauce * Tabasco sauce * tartare sauce, tartar sauce * tomato sauce * what's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander * Worcester sauce * Worcestershire sauce

    Verb

    (sauc)
  • To add sauce to; to season.
  • To cause to relish anything, as if with a sauce; to tickle or gratify, as the palate; to please; to stimulate.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Earth, yield me roots; / Who seeks for better of thee, sauce his palate / With thy most operant poison!
  • To make poignant; to give zest, flavour or interest to; to set off; to vary and render attractive.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • Then fell she to sauce her desires with threatenings.
  • (colloquial) To treat with bitter, pert, or tart language; to be impudent or saucy to.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll sauce her with bitter words.

    Suffix

    (head)
  • (slang) An intensifying suffix.
  • Derived terms

    * awesome sauce, awesomesauce, awesome-sauce * beatsauce * boss sauce * crazysauce * dopesauce * dumb sauce * gay sauce * fail sauce * lamesauce * scary sauce * sweet sauce * weaksauce * win sauce

    See also

    * bechamel * catsup * coulis * gravy * ketchup * salsa * soy

    Anagrams

    * English 4chan slang ----

    souse

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something kept or steeped in brine
  • # The pickled ears, feet, etc., of swine.
  • #* (and other bibliographic details) Tusser
  • And he that can rear up a pig in his house, / Hath cheaper his bacon, and sweeter his souse .
  • ## (US, Appalachian) Pickled scrapple.
  • ## (Caribbean) Pickled or boiled ears and feet of a pig
  • # A pickle made with salt.
  • # The ear; especially, a hog's ear.
  • The act of sousing; a plunging into water.
  • A person suffering from the disease of alcoholism.
  • See also
    * (food) brawn, budin, haggis, head cheese, pudding, sausage, scrapple

    Verb

    (sous)
  • To immerse in liquid; to steep or drench.
  • * (and other bibliographic details) Addison
  • They soused me over head and ears in water.
  • * (and other bibliographic details) Gascoigne
  • although I be well soused in this shower
  • *1913 , , (Sons and Lovers) ,
  • *:As she heard him sousing heartily in cold water, heard the eager scratch of the steel comb on the side of the bowl, as he wetted his hair, she closed her eyes in disgust.
  • Derived terms

    * soused

    Etymology 2

    Obscure origin. Compare Middle German sûs (noise).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of sousing, or swooping.
  • * (and other bibliographic details) (Spenser)
  • As a falcon fair / That once hath failed or her souse full near.
  • A heavy blow.
  • * 1596 , Spencer, Fairie Queene
  • His murdrous mace he vp did reare, That seemed nought the souse thereof could beare.

    Verb

    (sous)
  • to strike, beat
  • to fall heavily
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.4:
  • Him so transfixed she before her bore / Beyond his croupe, the length of all her launce; / Till, sadly soucing on the sandy shore, / He tombled on an heape, and wallowd in his gore.
  • * (and other bibliographic details) J. Dryden. Jr.
  • Jove's bird will souse upon the tim'rous hare.
  • to pounce upon
  • * (and other bibliographic details) (Shakespeare)
  • [The gallant monarch] like eagle o'er his serie towers, / To souse annoyance that comes near his nest.

    Etymology 3

    (plural of (m)).

    Noun

  • (label) sou (the French coin)
  • (label) A small amount
  • Anagrams

    *