Sound vs Bark - What's the difference?

sound | bark |


As nouns the difference between sound and bark

is that sound is a sensation perceived by the ear caused by the vibration of air or some other medium or sound can be (geography) a long narrow inlet, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean or sound can be a long, thin probe for body cavities or canals such as the urethra or sound can be the air bladder of a fish while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

As verbs the difference between sound and bark

is that sound is to produce a sound or sound can be dive downwards, used of a whale while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

As a adjective sound

is healthy.

As a adverb sound

is soundly.

As a interjection sound

is (british|slang) yes; used to show agreement or understanding, generally without much enthusiasm.

sound

English

Alternative forms

* soune (obsolete), sowne (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) sound, sund, isund, . See (l).

Adjective

(er)
  • Healthy.
  • He was safe and sound .
    In horse management a sound horse is one with no health problems that might affect its suitability for its intended work.
  • *
  • Complete, solid, or secure.
  • Fred assured me the floorboards were sound .
  • * Chapman
  • The brasswork here, how rich it is in beams, / And how, besides, it makes the whole house sound .
  • (mathematics, logic) Having the property of soundness.
  • *
  • With fresh material, taxonomic conclusions are leavened by recognition that the material examined reflects the site it occupied; a herbarium packet gives one only a small fraction of the data desirable for sound conclusions. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get
  • (British, slang) Good.
  • "How are you?" - "I'm sound ."
    That's a sound track you're playing.
  • (of sleep) Quiet]] and deep.
  • Her sleep was sound .
  • Heavy; laid on with force.
  • a sound beating
  • Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective.
  • a sound title to land
    Hypernyms
    * (in logic) valid
    Derived terms
    * safe and sound * sound as a bell * soundly

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Soundly.
  • * Spenser
  • So sound he slept that naught might him awake.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (British, slang) Yes; used to show agreement or understanding, generally without much enthusiasm.
  • "I found my jacket." - "Sound ."

    Etymology 2

    * Noun: from (etyl) sownde, alteration of sowne, from (etyl) sun, soun, (etyl) son, from accusative of (etyl) sonus. * Verb: from (etyl) sownden, sounen, from (etyl) suner, (etyl) soner (modern sonner ), from (etyl) * The euphonic -d appears in the fifteenth century. (wikipedia sound)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sensation perceived by the ear caused by the vibration of air or some other medium.
  • :
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:The warlike sound / Of trumpets loud and clarions.
  • A vibration capable of causing such sensations.
  • *
  • *:It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street.. He halted opposite the Privy Gardens, and, with his face turned skywards, listened until the sound of the Tower guns smote again on the ear and dispelled his doubts.
  • (lb) A distinctive style and sonority of a particular musician, orchestra etc
  • Noise without meaning; empty noise.
  • *(John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • *:Sense and not sound must be the principle.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Troponyms
    * noise * quiet * silence
    See also
    * audible

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To produce a sound.
  • When the horn sounds , take cover.
  • (copulative) To convey an impression by one's sound.
  • He sounded good when we last spoke.
    That story sounds like a pack of lies!
  • * Shakespeare
  • How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues!
  • To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound.
  • * Bible, 1 Thessalonians i. 8
  • From you sounded out the word of the Lord.
  • (legal) Often with "in"; to arise or to be recognizable as arising within a particular area of law.
  • * '>citation
  • To cause to produce a sound.
  • He sounds the instrument.
  • (phonetics) To pronounce a vowel or a consonant.
  • The "e" in "house" isn't sounded .
    Synonyms
    * (to make noise)echo, reecho, resonate * See also
    Derived terms
    * empty vessels make the most sound * infrasound * instantaneous sound pressure * missound * outsound * second sound * soundage * sound-alike * sound alphabet * sound and light/sound-and-light show * sound barrier * sound bite/soundbite * sound bow * sound box * sound camera * sound card * sounded * sound effect * sound energy * sound engineer * sound engineering * sounder * soundex * sound film * sound hole * sounding board * sound law * soundless * sound like * sound man/soundman * sound off * sound out * sound pollution * sound pressure * sound projection * soundproof/sound-proof * sound recording * sound reproduction * soundscape * sound spectrum * sound stage/soundstage * sound structure * sound system * sound track/soundtrack * sound truck * sound wave * speech sound * speed of sound * surround-sound/surround sound * third heart sound * third sound * ultrasound * unsound * voiced sound

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) sound, sund, from (etyl) . Related to (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (geography) A long narrow inlet, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean.
  • Puget Sound'''; Owen '''Sound
  • * Camden
  • The Sound of Denmark, where ships pay toll.
  • The air bladder of a fish.
  • Cod sounds are an esteemed article of food.
  • A cuttlefish.
  • (Ainsworth)

    Etymology 4

    (etyl) . More at

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • dive downwards, used of a whale.
  • The whale sounded and eight hundred feet of heavy line streaked out of the line tub before he ended his dive.
  • To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe.
  • When I sounded him, he appeared to favor the proposed deal.
  • * Dryden
  • I was in jest, / And by that offer meant to sound your breast.
  • * Addison
  • I've sounded my Numidians man by man.
  • test; ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device.
  • Mariners on sailing ships would sound the depth of the water with a weighted rope.
  • (medicine) To examine with the instrument called a sound, or by auscultation or percussion.
  • to sound a patient, or the bladder or urethra

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A long, thin probe for body cavities or canals such as the urethra.
  • bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.