Inebriate vs Sot - What's the difference?

inebriate | sot |


As nouns the difference between inebriate and sot

is that inebriate is a person who is intoxicated, especially one who is habitually drunk while sot is soot.

As a verb inebriate

is to cause to be drunk; to intoxicate.

As an adjective inebriate

is intoxicated; drunk.

inebriate

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A person who is intoxicated, especially one who is habitually drunk.
  • * 1889 , , Driven From Home , ch. 18:
  • As he walked along, the inebriate , whose gait was at first unsteady, recovered his equilibrium and required less help.

    Synonyms

    * drunkard

    Verb

    (inebriat)
  • To cause to be drunk; to intoxicate.
  • (figurative) To disorder the senses of; to exhilarate, elate or stupefy as if by spirituous drink.
  • * Macaulay
  • The inebriating effect of popular applause.
  • To become drunk.
  • (Francis Bacon)

    Synonyms

    * intoxicate

    Derived terms

    * inebriacy * inebriant * inebriation * inebriative * inebriety * inebriism * inebrious

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • intoxicated; drunk
  • * Udall
  • Thus spake Peter, as a man inebriate and made drunken with the sweetness of this vision, not knowing what he said.
    ----

    sot

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) stupid person; fool
  • * 1610 , , act 3 scene 2
  • Remember / First to possess his books; for without them / He's but a sot , as I am
  • * Oldham
  • In Egypt oft has seen the Sot bow down, / And reverence some deified Baboon.
  • drunkard
  • * Roscommon
  • Every sign / That calls the staring sots to nasty wine.

    Derived terms

    * sottish

    Verb

  • To drink until one becomes drunk
  • To stupefy; to infatuate; to besot.
  • * Dryden
  • I hate to see a brave, bold fellow sotted .

    Derived terms

    * sotted

    Anagrams

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