Surer vs Sorer - What's the difference?

surer | sorer |


As a verb surer

is .

As an adjective sorer is

(sore).

surer

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (sure)

  • sure

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Physically secure and certain, non-failing, reliable.
  • Certain in one's knowledge or belief.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.}}
  • Certain to act or be a specified way.
  • (obsolete) Free from danger; safe; secure.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Fear not; the forest is not three leagues off; / If we recover that we are sure enough.
  • (obsolete) Betrothed; engaged to marry.
  • * Sir T. More
  • The king was sure to Dame Elizabeth Lucy, and her husband before God.
  • * Brome
  • I presume that you had been sure as fast as faith could bind you, man and wife.

    Synonyms

    * (secure and steadfast) certain, failsafe, reliable * (sense, steadfast in one's knowledge or belief) certain, positive, wis

    Derived terms

    * for sure * surely * sure up (sure)

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Without doubt.
  • Sure he's coming! Why wouldn't he?
    "Did you kill that bear yourself? ?"I sure did!"

    Usage notes

    * Often proscribed in favor of surely. May be informal.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (rft-sense) Yes, of course.
  • Synonyms

    * certainly, of course, OK, yes

    References

    * 1996, T.F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Etymology , Oxford University Press, ISBN 0192830988

    Statistics

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    sorer

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (sore)

  • sore

    English

    (wikipedia sore)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.
  • Her feet were sore from walking so far.
  • Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
  • * Tillotson
  • Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
  • Dire; distressing.
  • The school was in sore need of textbooks, theirs having been ruined in the flood.
  • (informal) Feeling animosity towards someone; annoyed or angered.
  • Joe was sore at Bob for beating him at checkers.
  • (obsolete) Criminal; wrong; evil.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Derived terms

    * sight for sore eyes * sorely * soreness * sore point

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (lb) Very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).
  • :
  • *
  • *:Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill. Ikey the blacksmith had forged us a spearhead after a sketch from a picture of a Greek warrior; and a rake-handle served as a shaft.
  • Sorely.
  • *1919 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Jungle Tales of Tarzan
  • *:[… they] were often sore pressed to follow the trail at all, and at best were so delayed that in the afternoon of the second day, they still had not overhauled the fugitive.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • An injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin.
  • They put ointment and a bandage on the sore .
  • Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • I see plainly where his sore lies.
  • A group of ducks on land. (See also: sord).
  • A young hawk or falcon in its first year.
  • A young buck in its fourth year.
  • Verb

  • mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait in the animal.
  • Derived terms

    * soring

    See also

    * blister * lesion * ulcer

    Anagrams

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