Snite vs Snitz - What's the difference?

snite | snitz |


As verbs the difference between snite and snitz

is that snite is (obsolete|or|scotland|transitive) to blow (one's nose) while snitz is (us|dialect|transitive) to slice.

As a noun snite

is (obsolete|or|scotland) a snipe.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

snite

English

(Webster 1913)

Etymology 1

Noun

(en noun)
  • (obsolete, or, Scotland) A snipe.
  • (Carew)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) snitan. Cognate with (etyl) . Related to snout and (snot).

    Verb

    (snit)
  • (obsolete, or, Scotland, transitive) To blow (one's nose).
  • (obsolete, or, Scotland, transitive) To snuff (a candle).
  • References

    * Thomson, J. - Etymons of English words - pg. 199

    References

    *

    Anagrams

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    snitz

    English

    Verb

    (es)
  • (US, dialect, transitive) To slice.
  • * 2007 , Harry W. Rutt, Back porch memories (page 82)
  • We snitzed and canned 56 quarts of pears by two o'clock.
  • * 2009 , Linda Egenes, Visits with the Amish: Impressions of the Plain Life (page 72)
  • Children look forward to apple snitzing , a festive fall event when neighbors gather to make apple cider at a community press.