Snite vs Snit - What's the difference?

snite | snit |


As nouns the difference between snite and snit

is that snite is (obsolete|or|scotland) a snipe while snit is .

As a verb snite

is (obsolete|or|scotland|transitive) to blow (one's nose).

snite

English

(Webster 1913)

Etymology 1

Noun

(en noun)
  • (obsolete, or, Scotland) A snipe.
  • (Carew)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) snitan. Cognate with (etyl) . Related to snout and (snot).

    Verb

    (snit)
  • (obsolete, or, Scotland, transitive) To blow (one's nose).
  • (obsolete, or, Scotland, transitive) To snuff (a candle).
  • References

    * Thomson, J. - Etymons of English words - pg. 199

    References

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    Anagrams

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    snit

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A temper; a lack of patience; a bad mood.
  • He's in a snit because he got passed over for promotion.
  • A U.S. unit of volume for liquor equal to 2 jiggers, 3 U.S. fluid ounces, or 88.7 milliliters.
  • (US, dialect) A beer chaser commonly served in three-ounce servings in highball or juice glasses with a Bloody Mary cocktail in the upper midwest states of United States including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, and Illinois.
  • The bartender served us each a snit with our Bloody Marys this morning.

    See also

    * snitty * snit fit

    Anagrams

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