Snort vs Sneer - What's the difference?

snort | sneer |


In lang=en terms the difference between snort and sneer

is that snort is to make a snort; to exhale roughly through the nose while sneer is to utter with a grimace or contemptuous expression; to say sneeringly.

As nouns the difference between snort and sneer

is that snort is the sound made by exhaling or inhaling roughly through the nose while sneer is a facial expression where one slightly raises one corner of the upper lip, generally indicating scorn.

As verbs the difference between snort and sneer

is that snort is to make a snort; to exhale roughly through the nose while sneer is to raise a corner of the upper lip slightly, especially in scorn.

snort

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The sound made by exhaling or inhaling roughly through the nose.
  • (slang) A dose of a drug to be snorted. Here, "drug" includes snuff (i.e., pulverized tobacco). A snort also may be a drink of whiskey, as "Let's have a snort".
  • (slang) An alcoholic drink.
  • * 1951 , Indiana Historical Society Publications (volumes 16-17, page 157)
  • Everybody tipped up the jug and took a snort of whisky and followed it with a gourd of cool water. We thought a snort of whisky now and then braced us up some and put a little more lift in us.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a snort; to exhale roughly through the nose.
  • She snorted with laughter.
  • (slang) To inhale (usually a drug) through the nose.
  • to snort cocaine
  • (obsolete) To snore.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The snorting citizens.

    sneer

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To raise a corner of the upper lip slightly, especially in scorn
  • To utter with a grimace or contemptuous expression; to say sneeringly.
  • to sneer fulsome lies at a person

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A facial expression where one slightly raises one corner of the upper lip, generally indicating scorn.
  • A display of contempt; scorn.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=8 citation , passage=It was a casual sneer , obviously one of a long line. There was hatred behind it, but of a quiet, chronic type, nothing new or unduly virulent, and he was taken aback by the flicker of amazed incredulity that passed over the younger man's ravaged face.}}

    See also

    * snarl

    Anagrams

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