Sneaked vs Sneaped - What's the difference?

sneaked | sneaped |


As verbs the difference between sneaked and sneaped

is that sneaked is (sneak) while sneaped is (sneap).

sneaked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (sneak)
  • * 1986 , , The Grasshopper Trap , p152
  • In addition to my sneaked' food, Eddit had ' sneaked a chunk of roast beef, a slice of fried ham, three wieners, some cheese, an onion, several quart jars of fruit, a jar of dill pickles, and a jar of canned rabbit.
  • * 1992 , , The Pelican Brief , p275
  • The restaurant opened at six, and he sneaked' down for coffee, then ' sneaked back to his room.
  • * 1994 , , Lord of Chaos , p235
  • *:"I sneaked up and listened," Nynaeve said levelly.
  • Synonyms

    * snuck (chiefly, North America)

    Usage notes

    * See sneak for notes on sneaked vs snuck.

    References

    * http://www.bartleby.com/61/89/S0508900.html * http://mw1.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sneak * http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_/sneak.html * http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/snuck.html

    sneaped

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (sneap)
  • Anagrams

    *

    sneap

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete), (l) (dialectal),

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (dialectal) To check; reprove abruptly; reprimand; rebuke; chide.
  • (Bishop Hall)
  • (dialectal) To nip; bite; pinch; blast; blight.
  • (Shakespeare) - King Ferdinand of Navarre; Berowne is like an envious sneaping frost, That bites the first born infants of the spring. - Line 100 from Love's Labour's Lost
  • (dialectal) To thwart; offend.
  • (colloquial) To put someone's nose out of joint; offend.
  • She was sneaped when she wasn't invited to his party.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A reprimand; a rebuke.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, I will not undergo this sneap without reply.

    Anagrams

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