Sneap vs Sneak - What's the difference?

sneap | sneak |


As nouns the difference between sneap and sneak

is that sneap is turnip while sneak is one who sneaks; one who moves stealthily to acquire an item or information.

As a verb sneak is

to creep or go stealthily; to come or go while trying to avoid detection, as a person who does not wish to be seen.

As an adjective sneak is

in advance; before release to the general public.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

sneap

English

Alternative forms

* (l) (obsolete), (l) (dialectal),

Verb

(en verb)
  • (dialectal) To check; reprove abruptly; reprimand; rebuke; chide.
  • (Bishop Hall)
  • (dialectal) To nip; bite; pinch; blast; blight.
  • (Shakespeare) - King Ferdinand of Navarre; Berowne is like an envious sneaping frost, That bites the first born infants of the spring. - Line 100 from Love's Labour's Lost
  • (dialectal) To thwart; offend.
  • (colloquial) To put someone's nose out of joint; offend.
  • She was sneaped when she wasn't invited to his party.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A reprimand; a rebuke.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, I will not undergo this sneap without reply.

    Anagrams

    * * * * * *

    sneak

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who sneaks; one who moves stealthily to acquire an item or information.
  • My little brother is such a sneak - yesterday I caught him trying to look through my diary.
  • A cheat; a con artist; a trickster
  • I can't believe I gave that sneak $50 for a ticket when they were selling for $20 at the front gate.
  • An informer; a tell-tale.
  • (obsolete, cricket) A ball bowled so as to roll along the ground; a daisy-cutter
  • Verb

  • To creep or go stealthily; to come or go while trying to avoid detection, as a person who does not wish to be seen.
  • He decided to sneak into the kitchen for a second cookie while his mom was on the phone.
  • To take something stealthily without permission.
  • I went to sneak a chocolate but my dad caught me.
  • (dated) To hide, especially in a mean or cowardly manner.
  • * Wake
  • [Slander] sneaks its head.
  • (informal, especially with on) To inform an authority about another's misdemeanours; to tell tales; to grass.
  • If you sneak on me I'll bash you!

    Usage notes

    * The past and past participle snuck'' is primarily found in North American English, where it originated in the late 19th century as a dialectal form. It is still regarded as informal by some, but its use appears to be increasing in frequency and acceptability. It is occasionally found in British and Australian/Hiberno-English, too, though regarded as an American form. (See Oxford Dictionaries, ''The Cambridge Guide to English Usage'', ''Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary'', ''Webster's New World College Dictionary .) * To sneak'' (take) something is not the same as to ''steal'' something. In this sense, ''sneak'' typically implies trying to avoid a supervisor's or guardian's mild displeasure or mild discipline, while ''steal indicates a more serious action and often the person stealing does not know the owner of the item being stolen.

    Derived terms

    * sneaker * sneaky * sneakily * sneakiness * sneak peek * sneak preview * sneak thief * sneak away * sneak in * sneak off * sneak out * sneak up/sneak up on * sneak around

    Adjective

    (-)
  • In advance; before release to the general public.
  • The company gave us a sneak look at their new electronic devices.
  • In a stealthy or surreptitious manner.
  • I was able to get a sneak peek at the guest list.

    Derived terms

    * sneak peek * sneak preview