Relate vs Snarl - What's the difference?

relate | snarl | Related terms |

Relate is a related term of snarl.


As verbs the difference between relate and snarl

is that relate is while snarl is to form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.

As a noun snarl is

a knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty.

relate

English

Verb

(relat)
  • To tell in a descriptive way.
  • To give an association.
  • To make a connection or correlation from one thing to another.
  • * 2002 , Paul Light, Karen Littleton, Learning with Computers: Analysing Productive Interactions (page 92)
  • The use of video made it possible to relate' the talk to the answers given to particular problems in the test. With this research design it was possible to ' relate changes in test score measures to changes in linguistic features
  • To have a connection.
  • I find it difficult to relate to others because i'm extremely introverted .
  • To interact.
  • To respond through reaction.
  • To identify with, understand.
  • (obsolete) To bring back; to restore.
  • * Spenser
  • Abate your zealous haste, till morrow next again / Both light of heaven and strength of men relate .

    Synonyms

    * chronicle * describe * divulge * recount * state

    snarl

    English

    (wikipedia snarl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty.
  • The act of snarling; a growl; a surly or peevish expression; an angry contention.
  • A growl, as of an angry or surly dog, or similar; grumbling sounds
  • Synonyms

    * (entangled situation) imbroglio

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.
  • To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots.
  • to snarl a skein of thread
  • * Spenser
  • And from her back her garments she did tear, / And from her head oft rent her snarled hair
  • To embarrass; to ensnare.
  • * Latimer
  • [the] question that they would have snarled him with
  • To growl, as an angry or surly dog; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds.
  • To speak crossly; to talk in rude, surly terms.
  • * Dryden
  • It is malicious and unmanly to snarl at the little lapses of a pen, from which Virgil himself stands not exempted.

    Antonyms

    * unsnarl

    Anagrams

    * ----