Snag vs Sniggle - What's the difference?

snag | sniggle |


As verbs the difference between snag and sniggle

is that snag is to catch or tear (eg fabric) upon a rough surface or projection while sniggle is to catch an eel by thrusting a baited hook into its den.

As a noun snag

is a stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance or snag can be (uk|dialect|obsolete) a light meal or snag can be a misnaged, an opponent to chassidic judaism (more likely modern, for cultural reasons).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

snag

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance.
  • * Dryden
  • The coat of arms / Now on a naked snag in triumph borne.
  • Any sharp protuberant part of an object, which may catch, scratch, or tear other objects brought into contact with it.
  • A tooth projecting beyond the rest; a broken or decayed tooth.
  • (Prior)
  • A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.
  • (figuratively) A problem or difficulty with something.
  • *
  • A pulled thread or yarn, as in cloth.
  • One of the secondary branches of an antler.
  • Synonyms
    * (problem or difficulty) hitch
    Derived terms
    * snaggy * snaglike

    Verb

    (snagg)
  • To catch or tear (e.g. fabric) upon a rough surface or projection.
  • Be careful not to snag your stockings on that concrete bench!
  • (fishing) To fish by means of dragging a large hook or hooks on a line, intending to impale the body (rather than the mouth) of the target.
  • We snagged for spoonbill from the eastern shore of the Mississippi river.
  • (slang) To obtain or pick up (something).
  • Ella snagged a bottle of water from the fridge before leaving for her jog.
  • (UK, dialect) To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.
  • (Halliwell)

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) A light meal.
  • (Australia, informal, colloquial) A sausage.
  • * 2005 , Peter Docker, Someone Else?s Country , 2010, ReadHowYouWant, page 116,
  • I fire up the barbie and start cooking snags .
  • * 2007 , Jim Ford, Don't Worry, Be Happy: Beijing to Bombay with a Backpack , page 196,
  • ‘You can get the chooks and snags from the fridge if you want,’ he replied.
    I smiled, remembering my bewilderment upon receiving exactly the same command at my very first barbecue back in Sydney a month after I?d first arrived.
  • * 2010 , Fiona Wallace, Sense and Celebrity , page 25,
  • ‘Hungry? We?ve got plenty of roo,’ one of the men said as she walked up. He pointed with his spatula, ‘and pig snags', cow ' snags , beef and chicken.’
    Synonyms
    * (sausage) banger (qualifier)

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A misnaged, an opponent to Chassidic Judaism (more likely modern, for cultural reasons).
  • Anagrams

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) ----

    sniggle

    English

    Verb

  • To catch an eel by thrusting a baited hook into its den.
  • Alternate spelling and pronunciation of snicker (corruption with giggle.) To chortle or chuckle.
  • (obsolete) To steal something of little value; diminutive corruption of snag + diminutive suffix.
  • References

    * Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Thesaurus 1993.

    Anagrams

    *