Smack vs Bark - What's the difference?

smack | bark |


As nouns the difference between smack and bark

is that smack is a distinct flavor or smack can be a small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and often called a or smack can be a sharp blow; a slap see also: spank while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

As verbs the difference between smack and bark

is that smack is to indicate or suggest something or smack can be to slap someone, or to make a smacking sound while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

As a adverb smack

is as if with a smack or slap.

smack

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) smac, smak, smacke, from (etyl) . More at smake, smatch.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A distinct flavor.
  • A slight trace of something; a smattering.
  • * 1883 ,
  • He was not sailorly, and yet he had a smack of the sea about him too.
  • (slang) Heroin.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To indicate or suggest something.
  • Her reckless behavior smacks of pride.
  • * Shakespeare
  • All sects, all ages, smack of this vice.
  • To have a particular taste.
  • Derived terms
    * smack of

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) smack (Low German .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and often called a .
  • Etymology 3

    From or akin to (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sharp blow; a slap. See also: spank.
  • A loud kiss.
  • * Shakespeare
  • a clamorous smack
  • A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To slap someone, or to make a smacking sound.
  • * (Benjamin Disraeli)
  • A horse neighed, and a whip smacked , there was a whistle, and the sound of a cart wheel.
  • (New Zealand) To strike a child (usually on the buttocks) as a form of discipline. (US spank)
  • To wetly separate the lips, making a noise, after tasting something or in expectation of a treat.
  • * 1763 , Robert Lloyd, “A Familiar Epistle” in St. James Magazine :
  • But when, obedient to the mode / Of panegyric, courtly ode / The bard bestrides, his annual hack, / In vain I taste, and sip and smack , / I find no flavour of the Sack.
  • To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate.
  • Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • As if with a smack or slap
  • Right smack bang in the middle.
    Derived terms
    * smack-dab

    Anagrams

    * ----

    bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.