Shut vs Slum - What's the difference?

shut | slum |


As verbs the difference between shut and slum

is that shut is to close, to stop from being open while slum is to visit a neighborhood of a status below one's own.

As nouns the difference between shut and slum

is that shut is the act or time of shutting; close or shut can be a narrow alley]] or [[passageway|passage acting as a short cut through the buildings between two streets while slum is a dilapidated neighborhood where many people live in a state of poverty.

As an adjective shut

is closed.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

shut

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) shutten, shetten, from (etyl) .

Verb

  • To close, to stop from being open.
  • Please shut the door.
    The light was so bright I had to shut my eyes.
  • To close, to stop being open.
  • If you wait too long, the automatic door will shut .
  • (transitive, or, intransitive, chiefly, British) To close a business temporarily, or (of a business) to be closed.
  • The pharmacy is shut on Sunday.
  • To preclude; to exclude; to bar out.
  • * Dryden
  • shut from every shore
    Usage notes
    Except when part of one of the derived terms listed below, almost every use of shut'' can be replaced by ''close''. The reverse is not true -- there are many uses of ''close'' that cannot be replaced by ''shut .
    Derived terms
    (phrasal verbs derived from shut) * shut away * shut down * shut in * shut off * shut out * shut up (single words and compounds derived from shut) * shutdown, shut-down * shut-eye * shut-in * shutout, shut-out * shutter (idioms derived from shut) * open and shut * shut one's eyes to * shut the door on * shut up shop * shut your face * shut your mouth * shut your trap

    Adjective

    (-)
  • closed
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act or time of shutting; close.
  • the shut of a door
  • * Milton
  • Just then returned at shut of evening flowers.
  • A door or cover; a shutter.
  • (Sir Isaac Newton)
  • The line or place where two pieces of metal are welded together.
  • Etymology 2

    Variation of (chute) or (shute) (archaic, related to (shoot)) from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A narrow alley]] or [[passageway, passage acting as a short cut through the buildings between two streets.
  • Synonyms
    * (alleyway) alley, gennel (Northern Ireland), ginnel (Yorkshire and Lancashire), gitty (East Midlands), jitty (Midlands), passage, snicket (Northern England), wynd (Scotland)

    slum

    English

    (wikipedia slum)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A dilapidated neighborhood where many people live in a state of poverty.
  • Go to the half built-upon slums behind Battlebridge [...] you will find groups of boys [...] squatting in the mud, among the rubbish, the broken bricks, the dust-heaps, and the fragments of timber [...].
  • :*Charles Dickens, Gambling .
  • Derived terms

    * slumdog * slumdom

    Verb

    (slumm)
  • To visit a neighborhood of a status below one's own.
  • To associate with people or engage in activities with a status below one's own.
  • Anagrams

    *